Category Archives: Weighing Benefits and Harm

Sex Crimes Victims’ Privacy

Sex crimes victims’ privacy: A Spanish woman kills herself when a sex video surfaces, causing a sensation in the Spanish press.

Meaghan Beatley reports a plea for ethics guidelines to cover gender violence. Spain’s Data Protection Agency moves to remove online revenge porn within 24 hours.

 

Use Of Graphic Photos Explained:

Use of graphic photos explained: iMediaEthics writer Sydney Smith tells why the Associated Press, The New York Times and USA Today published photos of a dead man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande.

Deemed a moment in time showing the danger and desperation of immigrants from Central America.

 

Photos Of Dead Bodies

Photos of dead bodies: Images of the bodies of a man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande are examples of journalists showing a truth the public would prefer not to see, writes Kelly McBride.

“Don’t exploit horrific photos without a journalistic purpose,” she advises. “But don’t hide them or place too many barriers in front of them, lest you duck your most important job.”

 

Ethics Of Showing Horrifying Images

Ethics of showing horrifying images: Photos of the bodies of a drowned man and his daughter on the bank of the Rio Grande raise questions about how far media should go in using such images.

They stir debates over news value, focusing public attention on tragedy and dilemmas and psychological impacts. The Society of Professional Journalists code of ethics says show good taste and avoid pandering to lurid curiosity.

 

A Welcome Shift In News Ethics

A welcome shift in news ethics: Kelly McBride notes a vast  majority of media covering the Virginia Beach murders refrained from naming the shooter unless absolutely necessary.

“It demonstrates that newsrooms can alter their standards and practices in a fairly dramatic way over a relatively short period of time….,” she wrote, to avoid glorifying a criminal and inspiring future mass murders.

 

Public Editors Redux

Public editors redux: Kyle Pope announces the appointment of public editors for The New York Times, the Washington Post, CNN and MSNBC.

“As watchdogs for the biggest news organizations in the country, they’ll be ready to call out mistakes, observe bad habits and give praise where it’s due,” he writes. “Most importantly, these public editors will engage with readers and viewers, bridging a critical gap.”

 

Stickers Warn Of False News

Stickers warn of false news: Some fact-checkers around the world developed sticker warnings, writes Cristina Tardaguila.

“For now, they seem to be a nice (and colorful) way to tell friends and family they are spreading low-quality information — and should think twice before sharing content,” she writes.

 

Using Drones In Journalism

Using drones in journalism: Newsrooms need policies on using drones, according to a Center for Journalism Ethics report.

“While news organizations and individual journalists are safely integrating drones into their daily operations, as well as the national airspace, it is crucial to remember that this evolving technology still faces many regulatory and legislative hurdles, not to mention privacy issues and ethical concerns,” says the report.

IRE Enforces Ethics Code

Updating its code of conduct, Investigative Reporters & Editors adopted principles calling for banning members who violate the code.

“IRE may take any action it deems appropriate to deal with those who violate our principles, including exclusion from our events, forums, listservs and the organization itself,” says the code.

By contrast, the Society of Professional Journalists says its ethics code is voluntary.