Category Archives: newspapers

Keeping Ticked-Off Subscribers

Keeping ticked-off subscribers: There are ways to keep angry newspaper subscribers, writes Laura Hazard Owen.

Try renewal discounts, extending or upgrading existing subscriptions and reminding customers of the “full” subscription price.

 

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Bad Year For Journalism Job Cuts

Bad year for journalism job cuts: The news business lost 3,000 jobs in the first five months of this year, writes Gerry Smith, worst since 2009.

“While tech giants are often blamed for the news industry’s financial troubles,” writes Smith, “they have also become a destination for journalists who want to leave the field.”

 

 

A Scary State In Newspaper Journalism

A scary state in newspaper journalism: Potential buyers pass on the fading Youngstown Vindicator, “and that’s scary as hell,” writes Joshua Benton.

The energy in the newspaper business for the past half-decade-plus has been toward consolidation, he writes. Lack of interest in the 150-year-old Vindicator might indicate consolidators decided that “financially there’s nothing of value left to consolidate.”

 

Use Of Graphic Photos Explained:

Use of graphic photos explained: iMediaEthics writer Sydney Smith tells why the Associated Press, The New York Times and USA Today published photos of a dead man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande.

Deemed a moment in time showing the danger and desperation of immigrants from Central America.

 

Philanthropy Boosts Western Media

Philanthropy boosts western media: A journalism collaboration stretching from Montana to New Mexico focuses on rural issues and Native American stories, writes Christine Schmidt.

A partnership started in 2015 aims to make local newspapers and TV stations useful sources of information.

Media Covering Their Own Scandals

Media covering their own scandals: Sex scandals in 2017 and 2018 brought down top media figures, forcing outlets to report about themselves.

Organizations faced questions of how sexual harassment and assault could fester unaddressed, writes Claudia Meyer-Samargia.

“But for individual journalists, particularly those who cover news media, questions focused on how they could cover these cases ethically, with the right balance of truth-telling, transparency and respect for privacy.” Protecting an organization’s reputation is an issue.

 

Opinion In The News

Opinion in the news: It’s a split decision when RAND looked at media objectivity, reports Laura Hazard Owen.

Journalism became more subjective over time, she writes. But it depends on the type of journalism.

“Newspapers reporting remains much as it was before the Web — but both TV and online news rely more heavily on emotion, personal experiences and argument.”