Category Archives: Weighing Benefits and Harm

Sharing Content Without Thinking

Sharing content without thinking: “A complex web of societal shifts is making people more susceptible to misinformation and conspiracy,” writes Claire Wardle.

“Most of this content is designed not to persuade people in any particular direction but to cause confusion, to overwhelm and to undermine trust in democratic institutions from the electoral system to journalism. Users become “unwitting agents of disinformation.”

 

Reporting On Special Needs People

Reporting on special needs people: A complaint about a headline referring to a “wheelchair-bound man” caused a Canadian newspaper to caution its staff when reporting on people with disabilities, reported iMediaEthics.

The term is “antiquated and ableist” ruled Canada’s National News Media Council. Say “person who uses a wheelchair.”

 

Reporting Hate Speech, Violence and Terrorism

Reporting hate speech, violence and terrorism: The Public Media Alliance of journalists in South East Asia adopts guidelines for covering hate speech, violence and terrorism.

An action plan workshop developed policies beginning with definitions leading to “how journalists and media professionals should respond to such situations.”

 

Building An Ethical Culture At NPR

Building an ethical culture at NPR: The NPR standards & practices editor tells Victoria Kwan about language usage, social media practices and urgent ethics issues.

“The bottom line is still fact-checking and verification,” says editor Mark Memmott. “Your credibility as a journalist will depend upon how well yo do those things, more than whether you’re the most clever writer or the fastest to spot a viral tweet.”

 

Sex Crimes Victims’ Privacy

Sex crimes victims’ privacy: A Spanish woman kills herself when a sex video surfaces, causing a sensation in the Spanish press.

Meaghan Beatley reports a plea for ethics guidelines to cover gender violence. Spain’s Data Protection Agency moves to remove online revenge porn within 24 hours.

 

Use Of Graphic Photos Explained:

Use of graphic photos explained: iMediaEthics writer Sydney Smith tells why the Associated Press, The New York Times and USA Today published photos of a dead man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande.

Deemed a moment in time showing the danger and desperation of immigrants from Central America.

 

Photos Of Dead Bodies

Photos of dead bodies: Images of the bodies of a man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande are examples of journalists showing a truth the public would prefer not to see, writes Kelly McBride.

“Don’t exploit horrific photos without a journalistic purpose,” she advises. “But don’t hide them or place too many barriers in front of them, lest you duck your most important job.”

 

Ethics Of Showing Horrifying Images

Ethics of showing horrifying images: Photos of the bodies of a drowned man and his daughter on the bank of the Rio Grande raise questions about how far media should go in using such images.

They stir debates over news value, focusing public attention on tragedy and dilemmas and psychological impacts. The Society of Professional Journalists code of ethics says show good taste and avoid pandering to lurid curiosity.