Category Archives: Minimizing Harm

Shooting And Mental Health

Where are the mental health stories? asks Meg Kissinger.

“The truth is we’ve effectively abandoned the public mission to care for people with mental illness in this country,” she writes, and lists ideas for every reporter to consider.

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Profiling Killers Or Victims?

Profiling killers or victims?

Russell Frank writes that mental health professionals urge journalists to focus less on the perpetrators of shooting rampages and more on the victims.

“The question that arises with every mass shooting is whether these instant illustrated profiles of the killers do more harm than good,” he writes.

The Internet’s Central Villain

 

The Internet’s central villain: Farhad Manjo asks what is the driving force behind much of the chaos and disrepute online?

“This isn’t that hard,” he writes. “You don’t need a crazy wall to figure it out, because the force to blame has been quietly shaping the contours of life online since just about the beginning of life online: It’s the advertising business, stupid.”

 

What A Man Would Do

All men should take a stand to curtail the shenanigans and misconduct by fellow males and at all-male occasions, writes Joe Hight.

“We as males should emphasize the importance of treating women and everyone civilly and with respect. We should pledge never to condone, participate in or hide blatant sexual misconduct. That’s what a man would do.”

 

European Free Speech and Press Advocates Worried

European advocates for free speech and press are worried, writes Mathew Ingram.

“France, Germany and the United Kingdom are all either discussing or are already in the process of implementing requirements for social networks to take measures to remove or block online hate speech, harassment and so-called ‘fake news'” considered threats to social order.

America’s First Amendment protects even hateful speech.

Top 10 Media Ethics Issues of 2017

Covering a time span of 84 years, iMediaEthics releases its annual report on the top media ethics issues.

Leading the list, writes Sydney Smith, is behavior in the workplace — the explosive story of top media figures who lost their jobs because of sexual misconduct.

In tenth place, the Associated Press releases a yearlong review into its working relationship with Nazis in Germany before World War Two.

Global Gender and Power Reporter

International coverage of gender and power: Pete Vernon writes about BuzzFeed News’s global women’s rights and gender reporter.

Women spend much of their lives and energy preparing against being attacked by a stranger, she says, when in fact more than 95 percent of the time we are violated by people we know.

 

Using The Term “Racist.”

Touchy subject — using the term “racist” while covering President Trump.

“Placing labels on speech by any public figure runs the risk of editorialization, and newsroom decision makers are wary of overstepping conventional norms,” writes Pete Vernon.

Bottom line: It’s time reporters do what columnists and opinion writers do, says Vernon.