Category Archives: Minimizing Harm

Right To Be Forgotten

Cleveland.com is exploring allowing people to request that their names be removed from stories about minor crimes they committed, writes Sydney Smith.

“Typically, news outlets do not unpublish — or hit delete — on historical stories,” writes Smith. Names would be removed from older stories if court records in their case were expunged. Use of mug shots will be greatly curtailed.

 

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Phone Hacking Backfires

Phone hacking backfires: Sydney Smith writes that the News Of The World’s publisher continues to settle phone hacking claims seven years after the British newspaper shut down in a scandal that erupted over invasion of privacy and confidentiality.

The newspaper’s publisher “is still paying out and admitting to phone hacking allegations against it,” Smith writes.

 

Hurricane Coverage Debated

Hurricane coverage debated: Meteorologists dislike the exclusive use of categories in defining the threats of hurricanes, reports Jed Gottlieb.

They want to see more reports with information readers and viewers can use to make important decisions, but do not agree on a better system. Local news is praised for being as urgent as needed.

 

Does Journalism Matter?

Does journalism matter? The public no longer reads us and politicians dismiss us, says Kyle Pope.

“Here’s the bottom line,” he writes. “We do these stories because we believe in something even bigger than what will become of them.”

They are important. Readers deserve to know them. They get us closer to truth. They’re the right thing to do.

Media Focus Needed On Climate Change

Media focus needed on climate change: Margaret Sullivan writes that a week of dire news conceals the urgency of a United Nations report on global warming.

“Just as the smartest minds in earth science have issued their warning, the best minds in media should be giving sustained attention to how to tell this most important story in a way that will create change,” she writes.

Toronto Star Updates Standards

Toronto Star updates standards: Sydney Smith describes new guidelines that mesh long-standing principles with current digital realities.

New policies call for greater transparency, labels for news and opinion and reluctance to unpublish except for rare circumstances.

 

Media Bullying

Media bullying: Alexandria Neason and Nausicaa Renner comment on media intimidation of Prof. Christine Blasey Ford.

“Journalists spend much of our professional lives wading through justifications for our subjects’ behavior and asking when has it crossed an ethical line,” they write. “This hearing shows the urgent need for us to examine our own.”

 

Staying Sane In A News Storm

Staying sane in a news storm: Margaret Sullivan gives seven tips to keep your cool in a hot mess, including:

“Take a break. The news never stops, so put down your phone, turn off your TV and do something else for a few hours. Cook a meal, take a walk, go to a yoga class, read a 19th-century novel.

“Of course, there’s a downside. Chances are that when you come back, some fresh mess will have hit the fan. But at least your heart rate will be lower — for a minute — while you catch up.”

 

Fact-Checking The NAFTA Agreement

Fact-checking the NAFTA agreement: Daniel Funke writes about concerns over false and inaccurate claims about the North American Trade Agreement and American trade policy. President Trump threatened to end the agreement.

“The goal: Bring more attention to policy issues that don’t get enough attention in a 24-hour news cycle dominated by Trump coverage,” he writes.