Category Archives: Photos

Offensive Halloween Photo

Offensive Halloween photo: Recalling a controversial 2014 photo of an effigy scene in a homeowner’s yard near Clarksville, Tenn.

A website news director uses the photo, then calls the Ethics AdviceLine for Journalists when the homeowner objects to the photo. Keep the photo up or take it down? From the archives.

Detecting Deepfake Videos

Detecting deepfake videos: Fake videos pose a grave threat to the 2020 elections, writes Olivia Beavers, unless media adopt policies to tell real videos from forgeries.

“In the internet age, newsrooms have scrutinized images and videos to determine whether they are authentic or fake,” she writes. “But deepfakes will be a more difficult challenge, particularly because artificial intelligence makes the authenticity of such videos indistinguishable to the human eye and forgeries harder to detect.”

 

Use Of Graphic Photos Explained:

Use of graphic photos explained: iMediaEthics writer Sydney Smith tells why the Associated Press, The New York Times and USA Today published photos of a dead man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande.

Deemed a moment in time showing the danger and desperation of immigrants from Central America.

 

Photos Of Dead Bodies

Photos of dead bodies: Images of the bodies of a man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande are examples of journalists showing a truth the public would prefer not to see, writes Kelly McBride.

“Don’t exploit horrific photos without a journalistic purpose,” she advises. “But don’t hide them or place too many barriers in front of them, lest you duck your most important job.”

 

Ethics Of Showing Horrifying Images

Ethics of showing horrifying images: Photos of the bodies of a drowned man and his daughter on the bank of the Rio Grande raise questions about how far media should go in using such images.

They stir debates over news value, focusing public attention on tragedy and dilemmas and psychological impacts. The Society of Professional Journalists code of ethics says show good taste and avoid pandering to lurid curiosity.

 

Using Drones In Journalism

Using drones in journalism: Newsrooms need policies on using drones, according to a Center for Journalism Ethics report.

“While news organizations and individual journalists are safely integrating drones into their daily operations, as well as the national airspace, it is crucial to remember that this evolving technology still faces many regulatory and legislative hurdles, not to mention privacy issues and ethical concerns,” says the report.

Student Reporters Covering Shootings

Student reporters covering shootings: The threat of an active shooter on campus confronts student journalists with a perfect storm, writes Maitreyi Anantharaman. There isn’t time to be scared.

The erosion of local newsrooms forces college publications to step in as papers of record, she writes.

 

Ethics of Stock Imagery

Ethics of stock imagery: Using old images with new stories is not ethical journalism, Mark E. Johnson tells Jack Kelly. It’s like using generic quotes in a story.

Visuals attached to stories increase engagement, writes Kelly. But “photojournalists and visual journalists are often the first members of a newsroom to be the victims of budget cuts,” resulting in the use of stock images.

 

A Plea For School Shooting Standards

A plea for school shooting standards: Education reporters should lead the way toward newsroom standards for covering shootings at schools, writes Emily Richmond;

“They should ask managers when their news outlets will name perpetrators and how often,” she writes. “They should also ask whether coverage of such an event will use tweets sent by students in lockdown, or share videos and photos from scenes of violence.”