Category Archives: Accountability

Fake News vs. Facts

Fake News vs. facts: Indira Lakshmanan says the Washington Post deserves a Pulitzer Prize for journalism ethics.

The Post’s investigative journalism “was most extraordinary for its transparency, breaking the fourth wall between the newsroom and readers by revealing those techniques to readers — showing how reporters got the story,” she writes. That reassured the public about the paper’s motives, methods and findings, and inoculated the Post against false claims, she says.

 

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Report For America

Report For America: Nellie Bowles updates status of nonprofit Report For America, aiming to put a thousand journalists in understaffed newsrooms by 2022.

Applicants “want to try to save democracy,” says a founder. Fellowships last one to two years and pay about $40,000.

“I felt like I needed to give something back to a place that has given a lot to me,” says one of the first reporters selected. “And journalism is the way for me to do that.”

 

 

Pulitzer Prize’s Future

Pulitzer Prize’s future: Meg Dalton writes that since 1917, 84 percent of Pulitzer Prize winners were men and 84 percent were white.

The Pulitzer Prize administrator tells Dalton “there so much going on in our country that speaks to diversity that will drive diversification. But our selection of a more diverse jury pool will impact that as well.”

Comey Hype Warning

Comey hype warning: Margaret Sullivan warns against a media “swoonfest” as the fired FBI director embarks on a tour to promote his anti-Trump memoir.

“The conflict-addicted media love a high-profile fight, and Comey vs. Trump continues to be a classic steel cage match,” she writes. “That is fine, as long as some critical distance is brought to bear.”

Sinclair Learning Moment

A Sinclair learning moment: “The controversy surrounding Sinclair is about more than partisanship, media consolidation and government oversight,” writes Pete Vernon.

“It’s about the very manner in which the American public understands where their news comes from and how it’s made.” Sinclair is perfectly capable of doing good news, a source tells Vernon. “But if consumers see things that offend them, they need to show it,” says the source.

Right To Be Forgotten

Right to be forgotten: Chava Gourarie writes about two British men who sued to keep their past crimes out of Google search results.

“As the first case to test the ‘right to be forgotten’ in England’s High Court, its outcome will likely set some ground rules in the roiling debate between personal privacy and freedom of expression on the internet,” she writes.

Denver Post Defiance Lauded

Denver Post defiance lauded: Ken Doctor sees a turning point in local American journalism’s descent into oblivison.

“And by standing up for their community, they stand up for themselves,” he writes. “This is the relationship that must be renewed. The loss here isn’t in mere journalism jobs; it’s in community knowledge and self-government.” He cites “vulture owners hollowing out local news.”

How Women Should Be Viewed

How women should be viewed: “It’s hard not to notice the magazine in checkout lines with the perfect women on the covers and the alluring headlines,” writes Joe Hight.

“It’s not uncommon to see those types of images in many magazines and on TV ads and social media. We and our children are flooded daily with thousands of messages telling us that we must be perfect to be accepted or successful. The damage is rampant.”

Retracting A Suicide

Retracting a suicide: Son found dead with a noose around his neck. Coroner rules it a suicide and the Toledo Blade reports it that way. The mother objects, the coroner changes the ruling and the mother wants the Blade to delete the suicide report from its online archives.

“But nobody can change old printed copies of any newspaper — and to be honest, online newspapers need to reflect what was actually published both in electrons and on newsprint,” writes the ombudsman. “The past is not always pretty, nor even accurate.”

 

Doubt Cast On Pulse Coverage

Doubt cast on Pulse coverage: Melissa Jeltsen writes that the widow of the man who killed 49 inside a gay nightclub in Orlanda, Florida, was wrongly accused.

“In the wake of the shooting, the media and public focused on certain details, many of which were later determined to be unfounded, and discounted others….,” she writes.