Category Archives: Weighing Benefits and Harm

Denying Coverage To Nazis

Denying coverage to Nazis: An Arkansas television station thinks about the news value in covering a Nazi rally, then decides to “give them silence,” writes Al Tompkins.

News director learns the protestors are not local, protesting an issue of no local importance.

 

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How Rape Is Covered By News Media

How rape is covered by news media: News reflects rape culture, or local norms toward sexual assault, writes Meg Dalton.

“Rape culture is difficult to measure,” she writes, “but there are a few common characteristics like victim blaming, implying victim consent, questioning victim credibility and empathy for the alleged perpetrator.”

 

Rage And The Media

Rage and the media: There is some merit to Trump’s claim that the media contributed to the current climate of fear and anger, writes Matt Lewis.

“Tell the truth, but in a way that is responsible,” he writes. “Eschew things that are salacious or done simply to gin up excitement. Exercise restraint and forbearance. The onus is on us to police ourselves. With great power comes great responsibility.”

 

Ethics Of Publishing Mugshots

Ethics of publishing mugshots: Is it preying on human suffering? Corey Hutchins reports that mugshots are a staple for some local newsrooms, while others avoid them.

“Some of those accused said they lost jobs and housing or relocated because they couldn’t find work,” writes Hutchins. Outcome of the cases often unknown.

Hurricane Coverage Debated

Hurricane coverage debated: Meteorologists dislike the exclusive use of categories in defining the threats of hurricanes, reports Jed Gottlieb.

They want to see more reports with information readers and viewers can use to make important decisions, but do not agree on a better system. Local news is praised for being as urgent as needed.

 

Stress Management Training For Reporters

Stress management training for reporters: Tiffany Stevens writes that reporters covering tragic events might suffer depression, anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder or greater risk of substance abuse.

“Even journalists who don’t experience secondary trauma may lose enthusiasm for their profession or undergo burnout, leading to less productivity and a decreased sense of well-being at work,” she writes.

Fortifying Newsrooms

Fortifying newsrooms: Kyle Pope writes that the five killed at the Capital Gazette forces us “to rethink the threat to journalism in Trump’s America.”

“It is heartbreaking, but necessary, to recognize that the openness that defines local news likely carries too high a risk; local newsrooms, at least for now, may have no choice but to fortify themselves.”

In the war against the press local journalists may be “most at risk.”

 

Cutting Relations With The President

Cutting relations with the president: Jay Rosen writes: “Journalists charged with covering him should suspend normal relations with the presidency of Donald Trump, which is the most significant threat to an informed public in the United States today.”

Send interns to White House briefings, he writes. Trump’s political style “incorporates a hate movement against journalists.”

Suicide Coverage Best Practices

Suicide coverage best practices: Kelly McBride reports that the deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain prompt a look at best practices in reporting on suicide.

Suicide is not a natural or logical outcome of adversity, she writes. “Instead, include a message of hope: Recovery is possible. In fact, most people who think about suicide do recover.”