Category Archives: Social Media

Reporting On Opioids

Reporting on opioids: Maia Szalavitz reports that journalists fail to understand the complexities of opioid addiction and alternative treatment for pain or addiction.

The pharmaceutical industry “flooded the country with opioids and excellent journalism has exposed this part of the problem,” she writes. “But journalists need to become more familiar with who is most at risk of addiction and why — and to understand the utter disconnect between science and policy — if we are to accurately inform our audience.”

 

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More On Covering Hate

More on covering hate: Amanda Darrach finds a culture gap between young technology reporters who think trolling rhetoric is funny, while older reporters take it “totally seriously.”

“Our system is geared towards media manipulation on a massive scale,” she writes. “There are a lot of reasons why we’re in the mess that we’re in. Some of it has to do with reporters making bad choices, but the system is just set up to be manipulated.”

Bottom line: “It’s our job to document the human condition, and that includes the ugly parts.”

 

Creating An Online Portfolio

Creating an online portfolio: Rachel Schallom says think about your unique skills when creating an online portfolio that shows your work history.

“It’s a common challenge for many journalists,” she writes. “There are many roles in journalism that don’t lend themselves to traditional clip packages — editors, strategists, engagement producers, product managers.”

 

Beware Pitfalls Of Amateur Video

Beware pitfalls of amateur video: The Toledo Blade’s managing editor apologizes for mistakes in reporting a fatal police-involved shooting based on a flawed Facebook video.

“The first of several mistakes we made in covering this breaking story was to share on our website a Facebook Live feed of a young man recording the gathering crowd in North Toledo and what people were saying. The man repeated over and over that police had shot ‘a young boy,’ a ’16-year-old boy,’ telling his Facebook audience that ‘someone said’ the boy was kneeling in the street when ‘the police’ shot him.

“None of that was true,” wrote the editor. The video photographer was not a trained journalist “and in our haste to ‘get something up’ we grabbed his Facebook video and shared it.” It was removed when police explained they shot a 25-year-old armed robbery suspect.

Another mistake was an inflammatory headline, later changed, saying “Police gun down man in North Toledo.”

Finding News Deserts By ZIP Code

Finding news deserts by ZIP code: Michelle Ferrier writes about the Media Deserts Project.

It’s a “research effort that is trying to map the ways in which many of America’s rural communities are indeed impoverished by the lack of fresh, daily local news and information,” she writes, and find media audiences.

 

Students: Diversity And Inclusion Over Free Speech

Students want diversity and inclusion over free speech.

Survey of college students finds support for free expression, but a willingness to restrict it in favor of inclusion.

Students see downsides of social media free expression because people can block views of others who disagree with them.

Suicide Coverage Best Practices

Suicide coverage best practices: Kelly McBride reports that the deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain prompt a look at best practices in reporting on suicide.

Suicide is not a natural or logical outcome of adversity, she writes. “Instead, include a message of hope: Recovery is possible. In fact, most people who think about suicide do recover.”

Spanish Digital Era Ethics Manual

Spanish digital era ethics manual: Paola Nalvarte writes that the International Center For Journalists published a guide on ethical principles.

“The document highlights credibility as a fundamental value of journalism in the twenty-first century.”