Tag Archives: Ethics

Use Of Graphic Photos Explained:

Use of graphic photos explained: iMediaEthics writer Sydney Smith tells why the Associated Press, The New York Times and USA Today published photos of a dead man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande.

Deemed a moment in time showing the danger and desperation of immigrants from Central America.

 

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Photos Of Dead Bodies

Photos of dead bodies: Images of the bodies of a man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande are examples of journalists showing a truth the public would prefer not to see, writes Kelly McBride.

“Don’t exploit horrific photos without a journalistic purpose,” she advises. “But don’t hide them or place too many barriers in front of them, lest you duck your most important job.”

 

IRE Enforces Ethics Code

Updating its code of conduct, Investigative Reporters & Editors adopted principles calling for banning members who violate the code.

“IRE may take any action it deems appropriate to deal with those who violate our principles, including exclusion from our events, forums, listservs and the organization itself,” says the code.

By contrast, the Society of Professional Journalists says its ethics code is voluntary.

 

 

Struggling With Ethical Dilemmas and Difficult Choices

Struggling with ethical dilemmas and difficult choices: Resist the temptation to classify every ethical issue as a dilemma, writes Nancy Matchett in an article appearing in the Ethics AdviceLine for Journalists archives.

“When facing a genuine dilemma you are forced, by the circumstances, to do something unethical,” she writes.

Affair Rocks Washington Media

Affair rocks Washington media: New York Times staff writers take a close look at the three-year affair between a NYT reporter and a security aide source, now part of a federal investigation and seizure of records.

“Avoiding conflicts of interest is a basic tenet of journalism, and intimate involvement with a source is verboten,” they write. But the central point is the seizure of a reporter’s records, says a Times statement.

Romance And Journalism

Romance and journalism: Indira Lakshmanan comments on a relationship between a New York Times reporter and an official of a government committee she covers, a failure of ethical journalism.

“It’s not a news flash that you can have a romantic partner and you can have a source, but they can’t be the same person,” she writes.