Tag Archives: Poynter Institute

Steps To Collaborative Journalism

Steps to collaborative journalism: “Collaborative projects focus on the experiences of affected people and represent exciting changes,” writes Emily Goligoski. Start with a revenue model.

 

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Photos Of Dead Bodies

Photos of dead bodies: Images of the bodies of a man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande are examples of journalists showing a truth the public would prefer not to see, writes Kelly McBride.

“Don’t exploit horrific photos without a journalistic purpose,” she advises. “But don’t hide them or place too many barriers in front of them, lest you duck your most important job.”

 

A Welcome Shift In News Ethics

A welcome shift in news ethics: Kelly McBride notes a vast  majority of media covering the Virginia Beach murders refrained from naming the shooter unless absolutely necessary.

“It demonstrates that newsrooms can alter their standards and practices in a fairly dramatic way over a relatively short period of time….,” she wrote, to avoid glorifying a criminal and inspiring future mass murders.

 

Stickers Warn Of False News

Stickers warn of false news: Some fact-checkers around the world developed sticker warnings, writes Cristina Tardaguila.

“For now, they seem to be a nice (and colorful) way to tell friends and family they are spreading low-quality information — and should think twice before sharing content,” she writes.

 

Liar’s Dividend Explained

Liar’s dividend explained: Exposing lies can have an unsettling backlash, writes Kelly McBride.

“Debunking fake or manipulated material like videos, audios or documents ultimately could stoke belief in the fakery,” she writes, making it harder for the public to trust the media. Collaboration by media could help.

 

SF Police Sow Suspicion of Media

SF police sow suspicion of media: The heavy-handed seizure of a freelance reporter’s records and devices is a gross violation of federal rules, writes Kelly McBride.

“By continuing to argue publicly that their raid was justified, and that this particular journalist is a bad person who shouldn’t be trusted, the SFPD adds to the public confusion over the role of the press,” she writes.

 

Poynter Deletes List Of Unreliable Sites

Poynter deletes list of unreliable sites: Poynter Institute says it “messed up” in calling 515 websites unreliable without checking the facts, reports Sydney Smith.

“These lapses are surprising given Poynter’s reputation and position as a vaunted journalism education organization,” writes Smith. Poynter admitted using lists compiled by others. Blames “methodology.”