Tag Archives: Poynter Institute

Fact-Checking The NAFTA Agreement

Fact-checking the NAFTA agreement: Daniel Funke writes about concerns over false and inaccurate claims about the North American Trade Agreement and American trade policy. President Trump threatened to end the agreement.

“The goal: Bring more attention to policy issues that don’t get enough attention in a 24-hour news cycle dominated by Trump coverage,” he writes.

 

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Futurecasting

Futurecasting: Ebony Reed writes about ways news companies can grow revenue and expand market opportunities in the future.

Futurecasting “is based on signals, trends and observing various industries to see how they can converge for various possible outcomes, offers us an opportunity (to) think beyond the current horizon,” Reed writes.

 

Celebrity Death Hoaxes

Celebrity death hoaxes: Daniel Funke and Alexios Mantzarlis report that celebrity deaths are a popular subgenre of misinformation and offer 15 fact-checking links.

“At a time when we are at pains to distinguish ‘real news’ from ‘fake news,’ falling for these shallow fabrications undermines the argument,” they write.

 

Good News On Media Trust

Good news on media trust: Indira Lakshmanan and Rick Edmonds report that trust in media scored higher since last year and “the great majority of Americans trust their local news sources.”

A Poynter Media Trust survey finds “that the president’s attempts to discredit the news may be having less effect a year and a half into his presidency.”

Seven Steps For A Free Press

Seven steps for a free press: “Let’s help people imagine, just for a second, a world without their regular news sources,” write Melody Kramer and Betsy O’Donovan, who propose news blackouts.

Rebuild a national belief that journalism is a public service, they write, not public enemy number one. News organizations must work together to do that.

Newsroom Security Tips

Ten newsroom security tips: Daniel Funke reports the Capital Gazette shooting prompts safety measures.

“It’s not cheap or feasible for all newsrooms to incorporate things like bulletproof glass, armed guards and safe rooms in their offices,” he writes. “But with a small investment, outlets can make big changes to their security protocol — which could come in handy during potential attacks.”

Doors that lock, updated visitor policies, cameras, panic buttons and shooting drills included.

Romance And Journalism

Romance and journalism: Indira Lakshmanan comments on a relationship between a New York Times reporter and an official of a government committee she covers, a failure of ethical journalism.

“It’s not a news flash that you can have a romantic partner and you can have a source, but they can’t be the same person,” she writes.

 

Suicide Coverage Best Practices

Suicide coverage best practices: Kelly McBride reports that the deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain prompt a look at best practices in reporting on suicide.

Suicide is not a natural or logical outcome of adversity, she writes. “Instead, include a message of hope: Recovery is possible. In fact, most people who think about suicide do recover.”

“Dead” Journalist Is Alive

“Dead” journalist is alive: Al Tompkins ponders the credibility impact of a Ukrainian ruse to nab a contract killer by saying a reporter was killed.

“Generally, journalists should not be part of a government deception plot,” writes Tompkins. “Generally, journalists should not be part of something that will produce untrue global coverage.”

Everyone who published or broadcast the false information has a stake in knowing the decisions that led to creating a fake news story, he adds.