Tag Archives: Poynter Institute

Newsroom Security Tips

Ten newsroom security tips: Daniel Funke reports the Capital Gazette shooting prompts safety measures.

“It’s not cheap or feasible for all newsrooms to incorporate things like bulletproof glass, armed guards and safe rooms in their offices,” he writes. “But with a small investment, outlets can make big changes to their security protocol — which could come in handy during potential attacks.”

Doors that lock, updated visitor policies, cameras, panic buttons and shooting drills included.

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Romance And Journalism

Romance and journalism: Indira Lakshmanan comments on a relationship between a New York Times reporter and an official of a government committee she covers, a failure of ethical journalism.

“It’s not a news flash that you can have a romantic partner and you can have a source, but they can’t be the same person,” she writes.

 

Suicide Coverage Best Practices

Suicide coverage best practices: Kelly McBride reports that the deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain prompt a look at best practices in reporting on suicide.

Suicide is not a natural or logical outcome of adversity, she writes. “Instead, include a message of hope: Recovery is possible. In fact, most people who think about suicide do recover.”

“Dead” Journalist Is Alive

“Dead” journalist is alive: Al Tompkins ponders the credibility impact of a Ukrainian ruse to nab a contract killer by saying a reporter was killed.

“Generally, journalists should not be part of a government deception plot,” writes Tompkins. “Generally, journalists should not be part of something that will produce untrue global coverage.”

Everyone who published or broadcast the false information has a stake in knowing the decisions that led to creating a fake news story, he adds.

Fake News vs. Facts

Fake News vs. facts: Indira Lakshmanan says the Washington Post deserves a Pulitzer Prize for journalism ethics.

The Post’s investigative journalism “was most extraordinary for its transparency, breaking the fourth wall between the newsroom and readers by revealing those techniques to readers — showing how reporters got the story,” she writes. That reassured the public about the paper’s motives, methods and findings, and inoculated the Post against false claims, she says.

 

“Activist” A Dangerous Word

“Activist” is a loaded word, writes Tara Murtha.

“Certainly, there are occasions when ‘activist’ is an appropriate way to identify a participant in an article,” she writes. “Often, though, identifying someone as an ‘activist’ is a subtle but effective way to degrade the person you are quoting and their perspective by erasing credentials and professional expertise.”

 

Avoiding Off-The-Record Interviews

 

Indira Lakshmanan calls off-the-record interviews a trap.

“We earn public trust by providing true and accurate information and being clear with our audience and our sources about the ground rules under which we gather news,” she writes. “If news is in the public interest and we can’t inform the public, we’re not doing our jobs.”

 

Keeping the Long Run in Mind at Ethics Summit

“My view is that we have to keep the long run in mind,” Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron tells the Poynter Institute’s Journalism Ethics Summit. Scott Nover reports on trust in the media and other big stories in the Trump presidency.