Tag Archives: Poynter Institute

Journalists With Kids Work At Home

Journalists with kids work at home: As schools close, the impact depends on the age of kids, writes Kristen Hare.

“It’s like a snow day, but for a pandemic.”

 

Covering Coronavirus Better

Covering coronavirus better: Shoddy coverage of the virus can cause panic and overreaction, writes Al Tompkins.

Limit adjectives, choose images carefully, frame stories with context, bust myths and get creative.

“The public is starting to freak out,” he writes. “Don’t add to it with screaming clickbait headlines and scary generic images.”

 

Newsroom Diversity Failing

Newsroom diversity failing: We must put the responsibility on the cultural institution we call journalism, not just its individuals or organizations, writes Kathleen McElroy.

“Like all white patriarchal institutions in America, journalism has seen itself outside of and superior to race — and also by extension, gender, sexuality, nationality, religion and able-bodiedness,” she writes.

 

 

Photos Of Dead Bodies

Photos of dead bodies: Images of the bodies of a man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande are examples of journalists showing a truth the public would prefer not to see, writes Kelly McBride.

“Don’t exploit horrific photos without a journalistic purpose,” she advises. “But don’t hide them or place too many barriers in front of them, lest you duck your most important job.”

 

A Welcome Shift In News Ethics

A welcome shift in news ethics: Kelly McBride notes a vast  majority of media covering the Virginia Beach murders refrained from naming the shooter unless absolutely necessary.

“It demonstrates that newsrooms can alter their standards and practices in a fairly dramatic way over a relatively short period of time….,” she wrote, to avoid glorifying a criminal and inspiring future mass murders.

 

Stickers Warn Of False News

Stickers warn of false news: Some fact-checkers around the world developed sticker warnings, writes Cristina Tardaguila.

“For now, they seem to be a nice (and colorful) way to tell friends and family they are spreading low-quality information — and should think twice before sharing content,” she writes.