Category Archives: Fairness

Journalists Are Not The Enemy

Journalists are not the enemy: The Boston Globe’s editorial board publishes its response to President Trump’s attack on the media.

More than 350 news outlets joined the Globe’s move to support a free press.

“A central pillar of President Trump’s politics is a sustained assault on the free press,” writes the Globe. “Journalists are not classified as fellow Americans, but rather ‘the enemy of the people.’ This relentless assault on the free press has dangerous consequences.”

 

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Media Mount Attack On “Fake News” Charges

Media mount attack on “fake news” charges.

Cleve R. Wootson Jr. writes the Boston Globe urges American news groups to respond to the president’s scorn of the press.

“The rally calls for the opinion writers that staff newspaper editorial boards to produce independent opinion pieces about Trump’s attacks on the media,” he writes. The Associated Press reports that 70 news organizations agreed.

 

Unique Challenges Of Religion Reporting

Unique challenges of religion reporting: Steven Potter writes about the difficulties of the religion beat.

“As they dive into different cultures and broach highly sensitive subjects with complete strangers, they face a number of unique challenges,” he writes.

Chicago Tribune religion reporter Manya Brachear Pashman says her mission “is to teach people about religions they may not be exposed to,” and put aside personal beliefs.

Domestic Violence Coverage Standards

Domestic violence coverage standards: Justin Ray examines a conflict between Vermont State Police and the Barre Times Argus over a murder-suicide.

The local newspaper “ultimately pledged to improve its standards for domestic violence coverage — though the paper’s editor raised concerns about the (police) spokesman’s voluble criticism and the potential precedent it sets for the paper’s relationship with a prominent state agency,” Ray writes.

Solidarity Among Reporters

Solidarity among reporters: Michael Grynbaum writes about “an unusual show of solidarity” at a White House press briefing when Jordan Fabian yields to Hallie Jackson.

It “seemed to signal a new approach by the White House press corps toward an administration that regularly uses briefings to deride, and divide, the news media.” Called a “classy move.”

 

Defining Civility

Defining civility: The Washington Post’s editorial board sees strong political feelings spilling over into the private sphere.

“We understand the strength of feelings, but we don’t think the spilling is a healthy development,” says the board. “Those who are insisting that we are in a special moment justifying incivility should think for a moment how many Americans might find their own special moment.”

Other views on civility and media appear in Commentary, Vice, Salon, the Washington Post, the New York Times and Vox.

Paying Sources Akin To Paying For Sex

Paying sources akin to paying for sex: Canadian editor Erica Lenti argues for reconsidering the staunch rule against paying sources for information.

“What’s important — for editors, writers and all journalists in this countryh (Canada) — is to make considerations and break the rules when they need to be broken,” she writes in This Magazine, a Canadian political publication based in Toronto.

Following The Money

Following the money: Mya Frazier reports that an obscure accounting rule change allowed an alert reporter to discover how millions of dollars were siphoned from public services through tax breaks.

“Although Statement 77 was not intended as a tool for the press, the new disclosures have become a font of valuable information for journalists,” she wrote.

Hate Groups Manipulate Media

Hate groups manipulate media: Whitney Phillips warns that journalists covering hate groups unwittingly spread their hateful ideology and other false and misleading narratives “with news coverage itself harnessed to fuel hate, confusion and discord.”

 

Crazy Media Poll Answers Kill Public Trust

Crazy media poll answers kill public trust: Davide W. Moore explores CBS News poll on investigation into Trump administration ties to Russia.

“Apart from the confusing wording of the initial question, the poll results suffer from not measuring how strongly people feel about the issue,” writes Moore. “It’s highly unlikely that 95 percent of the public has thought carefully about the issues involved in the investigation, yet that is what the poll results suggest.”