Category Archives: Fairness

Truth About Kathy Scruggs

Truth about Kathy Scruggs: Hagit Limor writes that the “Richard Jewell” movie portrayal of a deceased reporter is “so skewed it would define libel if this was a piece of journalism instead of a piece of fiction created in Hollywood.” Besmirching a hard-working reporter.

 

Sex Abuse Against Freelancers Unnoticed

Sex abuse against freelancers unnoticed: Though sex abuse in newsrooms was a major story, writes Steven Potter, misconduct against freelance journalists got little attention.

Women are especially vulnerable, he writes. They have little recourse against abusers and remain unprotected.

 

NYT Privacy Project

NYT Privacy Project: The Times launches an investigation into the erosion of digital privacy, including its own practices.

“Though we know we must participate in this messy and rapidly changing ecosystem — one with plenty of bad actors — we are also working to ensure our own data practices live up to our values,” writes Publisher A.G. Sulzberger.

 

The Media “Reckoning”

The media “reckoning:” Margaret Sullivan agrees there should be a “reckoning” over media coverage of President Trump.

“I reckon that American citizens would have been far worse off if skilled reporters hand’t dug into the connections between Trump’s associates — up to and including his son Don Jr. — and Russians. That reporting has not been invalidated,” she writes.

 

Attribution And Plagiarism

Attribution and plagiarism: In the Ethics AdviceLine for Journalists archives, Stephen Rynkiewicz compares Renaissance artists with modern journalists.

“If the rules on fair play are shifting, the Renaissance atelier may be where to look for direction,” he writes.

“When they knew enough to transform their material, apprentices became journeymen and started their own studios. When journalists bring craft and intelligence to their work, they too become artists,” he writes.

 

Media Jumping to Conclusions

Media jumping to conclusions: The story about an encounter between Covington Catholic students and a Native American elder went global, and many in the media got it wrong.

“What responsible journalists do in such instances is exactly what they did here,” writes Kelly Hawes. “They keep reporting. They keep asking questions. They keep searching for the truth. When they’re wrong, they admit it. And they set the record straight.”

 

The Truth Sandwich

The truth sandwich: Repeating a lie helps it to live on, writes Craig Newmark.

“I predict that, in 2019, news organizations will start to institute new reporting methods to avoid being complicit. Tactics may include adopting the ‘truth sandwich,’ which means covering a lie by presenting the truth first and then following that lie with a fact-check, as well as increasing newsroom capacity to check claims for accuracy in real time, prior to publishing a story.”