Category Archives: Fairness

Shooting And Mental Health

Where are the mental health stories? asks Meg Kissinger.

“The truth is we’ve effectively abandoned the public mission to care for people with mental illness in this country,” she writes, and lists ideas for every reporter to consider.

Advertisements

Embedding And Linking Challenged

Embedding and linking challenged: Eriq Gardner says a judge’s surprising decision on the use of a Tom Brady photo could disrupt the way news outlets use Twitter.

“Many of these cases involved some application of the so-called ‘server test,’ where the direct liability of a website publisher for copyright infringement turns on whether the image is hosted on the publisher’s own server or is embedded or linked from a third party server,” he writes.

Paying For Photojournalism

Paying for photojournalism: Visual journalists say the value of their work and legal rights to distribute their photos often are not recognized.

Brush up on the National Press Photographers Association code of ethics, they say, and use it as a guideline in your newsrooms.

The Internet’s Central Villain

 

The Internet’s central villain: Farhad Manjo asks what is the driving force behind much of the chaos and disrepute online?

“This isn’t that hard,” he writes. “You don’t need a crazy wall to figure it out, because the force to blame has been quietly shaping the contours of life online since just about the beginning of life online: It’s the advertising business, stupid.”

 

What A Man Would Do

All men should take a stand to curtail the shenanigans and misconduct by fellow males and at all-male occasions, writes Joe Hight.

“We as males should emphasize the importance of treating women and everyone civilly and with respect. We should pledge never to condone, participate in or hide blatant sexual misconduct. That’s what a man would do.”

 

Opioid Crisis Collateral Damage

Opioid crisis collateral damage is a lesson for journalists, writes Byard Duncan.

Many states hit hard by the opioid crisis also are seeing a spike in foster care placements. In most cases, the broad designation of “substance abuse” is all that gets logged by social workers.

“Sometimes the information we don’t have is even more important than what we know,” writes Duncan. Think about who else is affected, keep an open mind.

 

Blacklist Uncovered By Arizona Education Reporter

“After three hours, I was the only reporter left in the room. Sometimes that’s all it takes.”

Hank Stephenson tells the story of an Arizona education beat reporter who discovers a blacklist of 1,400 school employees despite a teacher shortage. Patience and digging pay off.

 

Correcting Twitter Mistakes With Transparency

Correcting Twitter mistakes with transparency: Steven Potter tells how Thomson Reuters and the Associated Press correct Twitter mistakes.

“We don’t believe that an incorrect tweet should just be deleted without any further comment,” says a Thomson Reuters source. “To us, that would be lack of accountability.”

 

Quoting a Foul-Mouthed President

Journalists typically avoid reporting vulgar language, but they were tested over how far to go in repeating President Trump’s comments about “shithole countires,” or words to that effect.

Michael M. Grynbaum surveyed media and found they differed, some explicit while others nuanced. In this case, the profane quote was not incidental to the story, it was the story.

The reporting appears to follow the direction of a cultural shift to coarse language.

Observers note that Trump’s remarks follow others that forced journalists to consider their standards, like “pussy.” They also note that Trump is not the only president to use offensive language. President George W. Bush used an expletive to describe a New York Times reporter.

A generation of so ago, words like “hell” or “damn” were not seen in daily newspapers, or heard on radio or television, much less the F-word. These appear fairly commonly now.

President Lyndon Johnson often used colorful language, sometimes off-color. In 1965 Johnson ordered U.S. military intervention in the Dominican Republic, and reportedly said, “Those people couldn’t pour piss out of a boot if they had instructions on the heel!” The disparaging remarks could have upset U.S.-Latin American relations if they had been widely reported.

President Gerald Ford fired his agriculture secretary, Earl Butz, in 1976 for highly offensive remarks quoted in Rolling Stone Magazine about why African-Americans don’t vote Republican.

In the ongoing discussion of what to report or not, retired journalism professor Robert Buckman offers this thought from from Arthur Brisbane, American journalist, editor and author: “A newspaper is a mirror reflecting the public, a mirror more or less defective, but still a mirror.”