Tag Archives: Columbia Journalism Review

Critique The Critics

Critique the critics: Columbia Journalism Review thinks critically about the role of criticism.

“Do we need professional critics?” it asks. “There is something useful they can do: Show people what’s missing in their culture.”

 

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Audience Engagement

Audience engagement: Chip Scanlan writes about the power of talking to people in person, “a step that might once have seemed banal, but now seems almost radical.”

“There’s no substitute, as any experienced journalist knows, for face-to-face encounters,” he writes. “Though phone or email interviews may sometimes be efficient or necessary…., only in person can an interviewer observe the nuances of body language, details of environment and give reassuring nods and smiles that create trust and intimacy.”

 

Sex Crimes Victims’ Privacy

Sex crimes victims’ privacy: A Spanish woman kills herself when a sex video surfaces, causing a sensation in the Spanish press.

Meaghan Beatley reports a plea for ethics guidelines to cover gender violence. Spain’s Data Protection Agency moves to remove online revenge porn within 24 hours.

 

Public Editors Redux

Public editors redux: Kyle Pope announces the appointment of public editors for The New York Times, the Washington Post, CNN and MSNBC.

“As watchdogs for the biggest news organizations in the country, they’ll be ready to call out mistakes, observe bad habits and give praise where it’s due,” he writes. “Most importantly, these public editors will engage with readers and viewers, bridging a critical gap.”

 

Parting Company With Facebook

Parting company with Facebook: Journalists working with the giant tech platform is a Faustian bargain, writes Mathew Ingram: “The benefits of doing business with Facebook don’t begin to outweigh the ethical compromises required to do so.”

Ingram asks: “How much of what you are doing serves (Facebook’s) interests rather than yours, or the interests of journalism, or society in general?”