Tag Archives: Columbia Journalism Review

Media Climate Coverage Deemed Lacking

Media climate coverage deemed lacking: Mark Hertsgaard and Kyle Pope charge media with ignoring it.

“This journalistic failure has given rise to a calamitous public ignorance, which in turn has enabled politicians and corporations to avoid action,” they write.

They call for “Paul Revere” responsibilities to awaken, inform and rouse the people to action.

 

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Student Reporters Covering Shootings

Student reporters covering shootings: The threat of an active shooter on campus confronts student journalists with a perfect storm, writes Maitreyi Anantharaman. There isn’t time to be scared.

The erosion of local newsrooms forces college publications to step in as papers of record, she writes.

 

A Plea For School Shooting Standards

A plea for school shooting standards: Education reporters should lead the way toward newsroom standards for covering shootings at schools, writes Emily Richmond;

“They should ask managers when their news outlets will name perpetrators and how often,” she writes. “They should also ask whether coverage of such an event will use tweets sent by students in lockdown, or share videos and photos from scenes of violence.”

 

Ethical Boundaries–Paying For Interviews

Ethical boundaries–paying for interviews: “Reporters working with vulnerable populations, particularly in conflict situations, often face a high-stakes predicament: The job of bearing witness demands of us the highest ethical standards,” writes Annie Hylton. “At the same time, we confront extreme suffering, and even our pocket change might change someone’s circumstances, at least temporarily.”

 

The Problem With Native Advertising

The problem with native advertising: It’s paid advertising that looks like legitimate staff-written content and deceptive, writes Joshua Carroll.

“The commotion over the sponsored pieces raises questions not just about the ethics of native advertising, but about news providers’ broader relationship with governments.” It’s also called advertorials and used in digital marketing.

 

Bilingual Reporting And Translation

Bilingual reporting and translation: President Trump’s zero tolerance policy on border immigration makes bilingual reporting important, writes Alice Driver.

“Because language enables reporting — and comprehension of complex subjects in the news — it is essential for local and national media outlets to have bilingual journalists,” she writes.

Reporters Making Statements

Reporters making statements: CNN’s Jim Acosta lost press credentials after questions for Trump ended with a statement, note Al Tompkins and Kelly McBride.

“Ask tough questions, avoid making statements or arguing during a press event and report the news, don’t become the news,” they write.

 

Criticizing Journalists Responsibly

Criticizing journalists responsibly: Don’t make it personal, writes Philip Eil.

“In all cases, stick to the work, not the person,” he writes. Journalists are perfectionists. If your goal is to cause emotional pain, pointing to flaws in their work is often more upsetting than a personal attack.

It’s “a good time for a refresher for citizens on what constitutes a healthy, constructive conversation about the work we produce,” Eil writes.

How Rape Is Covered By News Media

How rape is covered by news media: News reflects rape culture, or local norms toward sexual assault, writes Meg Dalton.

“Rape culture is difficult to measure,” she writes, “but there are a few common characteristics like victim blaming, implying victim consent, questioning victim credibility and empathy for the alleged perpetrator.”