Tag Archives: Columbia Journalism Review

Report For America

Report For America: Nellie Bowles updates status of nonprofit Report For America, aiming to put a thousand journalists in understaffed newsrooms by 2022.

Applicants “want to try to save democracy,” says a founder. Fellowships last one to two years and pay about $40,000.

“I felt like I needed to give something back to a place that has given a lot to me,” says one of the first reporters selected. “And journalism is the way for me to do that.”

 

 

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Pulitzer Prize Reaction

Pulitzer Prize reaction: Ryan Kelly, Pulitzer Prize winner for breaking news photography, tells Justin Ray his reaction to getting the prize for a photo of a car crashing into a crowd of protesters.

“This experience has been bittersweet, and it is way more bitter than sweet,” says Kelly. “A person died, a lot of people were injured, people were in shock, a community has been terrorized.”

Pulitzer Prize’s Future

Pulitzer Prize’s future: Meg Dalton writes that since 1917, 84 percent of Pulitzer Prize winners were men and 84 percent were white.

The Pulitzer Prize administrator tells Dalton “there so much going on in our country that speaks to diversity that will drive diversification. But our selection of a more diverse jury pool will impact that as well.”

Sinclair Learning Moment

A Sinclair learning moment: “The controversy surrounding Sinclair is about more than partisanship, media consolidation and government oversight,” writes Pete Vernon.

“It’s about the very manner in which the American public understands where their news comes from and how it’s made.” Sinclair is perfectly capable of doing good news, a source tells Vernon. “But if consumers see things that offend them, they need to show it,” says the source.

Right To Be Forgotten

Right to be forgotten: Chava Gourarie writes about two British men who sued to keep their past crimes out of Google search results.

“As the first case to test the ‘right to be forgotten’ in England’s High Court, its outcome will likely set some ground rules in the roiling debate between personal privacy and freedom of expression on the internet,” she writes.

Bias Seen In Facebook Coverage

Bias seen in Facebook coverage: Mathew Ingram writes that “at least some of the enthusiasm with which media companies are covering Facebook’s trials and tribulations stems from their resentment over how the company has stolen their readers and advertising revenue.”

Media executives failed to adapt quickly enough to the internet, and then in a desperate attempt to catch up, handed too much of their business to Facebook and Google, he writes.

Thriving On Rejection

Thriving on rejection: Jackie Spinner writes about an Illinois Associated Press reporter who finds stories in Freedom of Information request rejections.

“Report on outlandish denials or those about significant public issues,” says the reporter. “Access to actions by public bodies is a huge issue and denials need to be exposed.”

 

Unplugging From The Internet

Unplugging from the internet, a questionable experiment: Dan Mitchell questions the accuracy of a New York Times columnist’s claim that he went offline, dispensing avuncular advice to his readers about the benefits of slowing down one’s news consumption.

“But he didn’t really unplug from social media at all,” writes Mitchell.

Small Newspaper, Big Punch

Asbury Park Press, a small newspaper known for big exposes, writes Matthew Kassel.

Its chief of news and investigations says every big project needs three components: A human element (for pathos), a new finding (preferably unearthed through public records requests) and a solution or two (for purposes of accountability).

Shootings Changing Education Beat

Post Florida mass shooting: Alexandria Neason says pay more attention to local reports of shootings and bomb threats, which are shifting education coverage.

“For local reporters working the education beat, local threats have dominated their attention the past few weeks, even if they’ve only been a blip on the national radar…,” she writes.