Category Archives: Online News

The Truth Sandwich

The truth sandwich: Repeating a lie helps it to live on, writes Craig Newmark.

“I predict that, in 2019, news organizations will start to institute new reporting methods to avoid being complicit. Tactics may include adopting the ‘truth sandwich,’ which means covering a lie by presenting the truth first and then following that lie with a fact-check, as well as increasing newsroom capacity to check claims for accuracy in real time, prior to publishing a story.”

 

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Regaining Public Trust In Journalism

Regaining public trust in journalism: “News organizations and journalism educators should teach members of the public (and their own journalists) how to stop being used as pawns in the meta-game of online disinformation,” writes Marie Shanahan.

“One antidote to modern information gamesmanship is more ethics and professional reporting.”

News Dying, Not Journalism

News dying, not journalism: News is losing its cultural relevance after two centuries, writes Hossein Derakhshan.

“The challenge for journalism in the years to come is to reinvent itself around something other than news, whilst resisting the seduction of propaganda and entertainment,” he writes.

“Innovation in journalism should not only be about business models or technology, it should be also about radically new culture forms and representation formats.”

 

Social Media Tops Print As News Source

Social media tops print as news source: For the first time, more Americans get news from social media than print newspapers, says the Pew Research Center.

Overall, television still is the most popular platform for news consumption, writes Elisa Shearer. Age gaps widen in media preferences. Print’s popularity persists among ages 65 and older. Younger Americans are not wed to one platform.

 

Advice To Aspiring Journalists

Advice to aspiring journalists: “Most journalists are, whether they think of themselves this way or not, explainers,” writes David Roberts.

“They are in the business of making sense of the torrent of information constantly deluging us all.”

Bottom line: “There are many different ways to do good journalism, but there is no way of becoming a good journalist that does not involve learning, trying and practicing: Doing the work.”

 

Scalp Headline An Ethical Lapse

Scalp headline an ethical lapse: Native American Journalists Association criticizes a newspaper for reference to genocidal practices.

“Referring to the act of scalping Indigenous people violates the dignity of men, women and children that were victims of the practice,” says the association.

“More importantly, such language downplays crimes now defined as genocide by human rights observers and glorifies such racially-motivated acts by ignoring context at the expense of Indigenous people.”

 

Journalism Entry Points Disappear

Journalism entry points disappear: Digital-media start-up Mic crashes and burns, writes Margaret Sullivan.

“With the tragic demise of local newspapers, places like Mic have become the entry point into the craft for a lot of young journalists,” she writes. “As they go under, such entry points disappear.”

 

Burned Out Journalists

Burned out journalists: Journalists are wilting under information overload, writes John Crowley. Hacks smooth their workload, like inbox zero.

“Management, either through wilful ignorance or a strong desire to react to the changing face of digital journalism, are simply asking journalists to stay connected far too much,” writes Crowley.