A Plea For School Shooting Standards

A plea for school shooting standards: Education reporters should lead the way toward newsroom standards for covering shootings at schools, writes Emily Richmond;

“They should ask managers when their news outlets will name perpetrators and how often,” she writes. “They should also ask whether coverage of such an event will use tweets sent by students in lockdown, or share videos and photos from scenes of violence.”

 

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High Ethical Standards In Pursuit of News

High ethical standards in pursuit of news: The Center for Journalism
Ethics names ProPublica a finalist for an ethics award.

In telling the story of a high school student trying to escape gang membership, ProPublica did not publish his last name or run photos that might reveal his identity.

 

The New Take On Editing Photos

The new take on editing photos: Pictures are vital to covering the news at a time when technology makes it easy to alter images, says a story in the Ethics AdviceLine for Journalists archives.

“It was not considered a big deal a decade or more ago” to alter a picture. “But now it is, because accuracy in photography is seen as important as accuracy in reporting.”

 

Saving Local Newspapers

Saving local newspapers: Dwindling local news leads to partisan political polarization write Joshua P. Darr, Johanna Dunaway and Matthew P. Hitt.

Local newspapers provide a valuable service to democracy by keeping readers’ focus on their communities,” they write. “When they lose local newspapers, we have found, readers turn to their political partisanship to inform their political choices.”

 

Revealing A Religion Reporter’s Religion

Revealing a religion reporter’s religion: One religion reporter had a strict policy against revealing her faith, writes Jaweed Kaleem.

“Today, as reporters become more diverse — by race, religion and more — and notions of objectivity become increasingly debated, some journalists on the religion beat are choosing to be more open  about their own faiths, and lack thereof,” he writes.

 

Attribution And Plagiarism

Attribution and plagiarism: In the Ethics AdviceLine for Journalists archives, Stephen Rynkiewicz compares Renaissance artists with modern journalists.

“If the rules on fair play are shifting, the Renaissance atelier may be where to look for direction,” he writes.

“When they knew enough to transform their material, apprentices became journeymen and started their own studios. When journalists bring craft and intelligence to their work, they too become artists,” he writes.

 

Ethical Boundaries–Paying For Interviews

Ethical boundaries–paying for interviews: “Reporters working with vulnerable populations, particularly in conflict situations, often face a high-stakes predicament: The job of bearing witness demands of us the highest ethical standards,” writes Annie Hylton. “At the same time, we confront extreme suffering, and even our pocket change might change someone’s circumstances, at least temporarily.”

 

A Path To Public Trust

A path to public trust: The Guardian’s editor-in-chief tells Julia Belluz that America needs the press.

“We can’t count on the judges in a way we could,” says Alan Rusbridger. “Congress is not doing its job. The checks and balances we thought existed in society are not there, and it’s only the press we have now. And the public are so willing to support the work of journalists and acknowledge the importance of what we do — but we have to be as good as they want us to be.”