Archive Photo Ruled Okay

Using a 2005 photo of a young woman posing in a British strip club was not an invasion of privacy, ruled the Independent Press Standards Organization.

Sydney Smith writes that IPSO found a news outlet may consider a voluntary action in the past fair game in the future.

The newspaper volunteered to take down the photo as a goodwill gesture and said it “understood that when one is young, one can make choices which are later regretted.”



Unplugging From The Internet

Unplugging from the internet, a questionable experiment: Dan Mitchell questions the accuracy of a New York Times columnist’s claim that he went offline, dispensing avuncular advice to his readers about the benefits of slowing down one’s news consumption.

“But he didn’t really unplug from social media at all,” writes Mitchell.

Small Newspaper, Big Punch

Asbury Park Press, a small newspaper known for big exposes, writes Matthew Kassel.

Its chief of news and investigations says every big project needs three components: A human element (for pathos), a new finding (preferably unearthed through public records requests) and a solution or two (for purposes of accountability).

Chicago Defender Fires Managing Editor

Conflict of interest: Tony Briscoe andElvia Malagon report that the Chicago Defender fired its managing editor for taking $10,000 to perform public relations work for an Illinois political candidate.

“The Chicago Defender is a longtime voice in this (African-American) community and it is imperative that we maintain the highest level of integrity and credibility,” the newspaper said in announcing it terminated the managing editor.

Shunning Hacked Emails

The case for shunning hacked emails: Nathaniel Zelinsky calls for a “responsible journalism pledge” to prevent Russian from meddling in U.S. elections.

“Most reporters distance themselves from questions about the origin of information, so long as it remains verifiable, while tech companies tend to believe no one should restrict access to information on the internet,” he writes. “But at this particularly dangerous point in our nation’s history, reporters and Facebook alike just might be willing to embrace a new ethical obligation out of a sense of civic duty.”

Copying Stories Is Dangerous

Repeating a mistake is a mistake: Sydney Smith cites a British Independent Press Standards Organization ruling showing the dangers of printing a story from another news outlet.

The original story was an invasion of privacy, and so was republication of that story, said the U.K. press regulator.

“The fact that this material had been published by another newspaper was not sufficient to justify this intrusion in the public interest,” it said.

Interviewing Traumatized Women

The ethics of interviewing traumatized women: Zahera Harb says journalists often add to their suffering.

“Seeking informed consent in such cases is crucial,” she writes. “But before asking Yazidi women to give consent to these stories being recorded and disseminated, journalists should have informed them about how, where and when their stories would be published or broadcast.”


Shootings Changing Education Beat

Post Florida mass shooting: Alexandria Neason says pay more attention to local reports of shootings and bomb threats, which are shifting education coverage.

“For local reporters working the education beat, local threats have dominated their attention the past few weeks, even if they’ve only been a blip on the national radar…,” she writes.