Holding Feet To The Fire

Holding feet to the fire: Margaret Sullivan writes that the Trump-Putin post summit news conference prompts a new era in American reporting.

For the reality-based press, “the job will require clarity and moral force, in ways we’re not always all that comfortable with,” she writes. “They are not always in ample supply by a too-docile press corps.”

 

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Death Of Business Reporting

Death of business reporting: Steven Pearlstein writes that executive suites shun reporters.

“Indeed, what’s happened in the corporate world is not all that different from what has happened in politics and government in the era of Donald Trump, whose administration has set new highs in terms of distrust and hostility toward the press.”

To be fair, Pearlstein adds that media share blame for the sorry state of corporate press relations because of cuts in staff and attention to the business world.

 

Finding News Deserts By ZIP Code

Finding news deserts by ZIP code: Michelle Ferrier writes about the Media Deserts Project.

It’s a “research effort that is trying to map the ways in which many of America’s rural communities are indeed impoverished by the lack of fresh, daily local news and information,” she writes, and find media audiences.

 

Newsroom Security Tips

Ten newsroom security tips: Daniel Funke reports the Capital Gazette shooting prompts safety measures.

“It’s not cheap or feasible for all newsrooms to incorporate things like bulletproof glass, armed guards and safe rooms in their offices,” he writes. “But with a small investment, outlets can make big changes to their security protocol — which could come in handy during potential attacks.”

Doors that lock, updated visitor policies, cameras, panic buttons and shooting drills included.

Fortifying Newsrooms

Fortifying newsrooms: Kyle Pope writes that the five killed at the Capital Gazette forces us “to rethink the threat to journalism in Trump’s America.”

“It is heartbreaking, but necessary, to recognize that the openness that defines local news likely carries too high a risk; local newsrooms, at least for now, may have no choice but to fortify themselves.”

In the war against the press local journalists may be “most at risk.”

 

Sleeping With Elephants

 

Reporters covering the circus can’t sleep with elephants: David Von Drehle faults editors in the affair between New York Times reporter Eli Watkins and a federal security aide.

“One after another, as Watkins rocketed up the career ladder, her supervisors failed to dig deeply enough to weigh the damage that could be done to the credibility of all media should her pillow talk be made public. Now that the laundry is aired and the damage is done, some of these same editors are minimizing the impact on media credibility.”

Defining Civility

Defining civility: The Washington Post’s editorial board sees strong political feelings spilling over into the private sphere.

“We understand the strength of feelings, but we don’t think the spilling is a healthy development,” says the board. “Those who are insisting that we are in a special moment justifying incivility should think for a moment how many Americans might find their own special moment.”

Other views on civility and media appear in Commentary, Vice, Salon, the Washington Post, the New York Times and Vox.