Global Gender and Power Reporter

International coverage of gender and power: Pete Vernon writes about BuzzFeed News’s global women’s rights and gender reporter.

Women spend much of their lives and energy preparing against being attacked by a stranger, she says, when in fact more than 95 percent of the time we are violated by people we know.

 

Advertisements

Using The Term “Racist.”

Touchy subject — using the term “racist” while covering President Trump.

“Placing labels on speech by any public figure runs the risk of editorialization, and newsroom decision makers are wary of overstepping conventional norms,” writes Pete Vernon.

Bottom line: It’s time reporters do what columnists and opinion writers do, says Vernon.

Cybersecurity Training For Journalists

Basic digital security competence is now essential for all journalists, writes Joshua Oliver.

“These days, bad security habits could betray your sources, or the sources of the reporter sitting next to you,” by clicking the wrong link.

Journalism schools surveyed devote less than two hours to digital security training, writes Oliver. Security should become a habit.

Good News Vs. Bad News

On the whole, the world is getting better, writes Bill Gates, Time Magazine’s first-ever guest editor.

“To some extent, it is good that bad news gets attention,” he writes. “If you want to improve the world, you need something to be mad about. But it has to be balanced by upsides. When you see good things happening, you can channel your energy into driving even more progress.”

Bad news arrives as drama while good news is incremental — and not usually deemed newsworthy, he writes.

Michael Wolff’s Access Journalism

Assessing Michael Wolff’s brand of access journalism: Nausicaa Renner and Pete Vernon say Wolff could not have written his book “without the hard work of journalists over the past year; the fire he catalogs was often fueled by stories from mainstream reporters.”

Wolff bluffed his way into the good graces of the Trump administration and produced “a thoroughly readable portrait of the Trump administration’s chaos and lack of preparedness.”

Probe Figure Dies By Suicide

What to do when the subject of a sex investigation dies by suicide: There’s no playbook for journalists about how to handle situations like that, writes Meg Dalton, about a Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting and Louisville Public Media podcast revealing the troubled past of a prominent political and religious figure.

The case “is an exemplar not only of dogged local reporting, but also a how-to for newsrooms grappling with unexpected ramifications,” writes Dalton, such as the death of a subject.