Hurricane Coverage Debated

Hurricane coverage debated: Meteorologists dislike the exclusive use of categories in defining the threats of hurricanes, reports Jed Gottlieb.

They want to see more reports with information readers and viewers can use to make important decisions, but do not agree on a better system. Local news is praised for being as urgent as needed.

 

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Tweets Come Back To Bite

Tweets come back to bite: College students beware of the future impact of tweets.

Sydney Smith reports that CNN White House reporter Kaitlan Collins apologized for her “ignorant language” in 2011 tweets while she was in college, calling it “immature.”

 

Does Journalism Matter?

Does journalism matter? The public no longer reads us and politicians dismiss us, says Kyle Pope.

“Here’s the bottom line,” he writes. “We do these stories because we believe in something even bigger than what will become of them.”

They are important. Readers deserve to know them. They get us closer to truth. They’re the right thing to do.

Twitter Pros And Cons

Twitter pros and cons: A research article by Shannon McGregor and Logan Molyneux reports that Twitter affects journalists’ news judgment, leading to “pack journalism”

Upside is “a wider array of voices into the mainstream news agenda.”

Twitter plays a key role in journalistic practices, they write. “Twitter’s growing centrality in the news process warrants greater scrutiny from journalists and scholars.”

 

Media Focus Needed On Climate Change

Media focus needed on climate change: Margaret Sullivan writes that a week of dire news conceals the urgency of a United Nations report on global warming.

“Just as the smartest minds in earth science have issued their warning, the best minds in media should be giving sustained attention to how to tell this most important story in a way that will create change,” she writes.

Hostile Media Effect

Hostile media effect: John Davis cites a media expert on public bias toward political  reports.

Hostile media effect involves people who are on opposite sides of an issue who both believe the same report is biased against their own point of view,” writes Davis. News consumers should think about political news stories from a less partisan viewpoint.

Kavanaugh Story Told In Photos

Kavanaugh story told in photos: Darrel Frost tells how the New York Times used two images to show contrasting views in the Kavanaugh hearing.

“This is masterful storytelling on the part of the Times’s photo editors,” writes Frost. “It’s rare we see a national political figure in such aggressive visage — not to mention a possible justice of the Supreme Court — and the photo, in this case, could portray the contrasts in the testimony in a way that text couldn’t.”

 

PBS Public Editor Quits, Dismayed

PBS editor quits, dismayed: Sydney Smith reports that departing public editor Mahulika Sikka found the public does not understand PBS.

“During my time as public editor at PBS,” she told Smith, “I was most struck by the fact that most people don’t understand the system, how it was set up, how it works, the fact that PBS is not a network and doesn’t produce content, and the fact that each station is locally run in order to serve the community it is part of.”

Journalism’s Top Problems

Journalism’s top problems: Jay Rosen lists challenges that torment journalists, including a right-wing populist wave across the U.S. and Europe that views the mainstream press as corrupt and elitist.

“In the United States the president is leading a hate movement against journalism,” Rosen writes. He also finds that discovering a business model that can sustain a quality newsroom is the industry’s biggest problem, but journalism schools are not designed for that.