Category Archives: Compassion

The Perils of Identification

The perils of identification: Obtaining permission is not the same as informed consent, writes Megan Frye.

A New York Times story about gang violence in Honduras including real names and photos is criticized for failing to recognize dangers.

 

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A Welcome Shift In News Ethics

A welcome shift in news ethics: Kelly McBride notes a vast  majority of media covering the Virginia Beach murders refrained from naming the shooter unless absolutely necessary.

“It demonstrates that newsrooms can alter their standards and practices in a fairly dramatic way over a relatively short period of time….,” she wrote, to avoid glorifying a criminal and inspiring future mass murders.

 

What #MeToo Means To Ethical Journalism

What #MeToo means to ethical journalism: Three “tragedies” lurk in the tech workplace, finds Claudia Meyere-Samargia while covering a University of Wisconsin ethics conference.

Quoting tech journalist Kara Swisher, they are lack of self-awareness and reflection, believing that money equates social good and having the inability to empathize with people who are not like you.

 

High Ethical Standards In Pursuit of News

High ethical standards in pursuit of news: The Center for Journalism
Ethics names ProPublica a finalist for an ethics award.

In telling the story of a high school student trying to escape gang membership, ProPublica did not publish his last name or run photos that might reveal his identity.

 

Ethical Boundaries–Paying For Interviews

Ethical boundaries–paying for interviews: “Reporters working with vulnerable populations, particularly in conflict situations, often face a high-stakes predicament: The job of bearing witness demands of us the highest ethical standards,” writes Annie Hylton. “At the same time, we confront extreme suffering, and even our pocket change might change someone’s circumstances, at least temporarily.”

 

Reporting Tragedy — The “Death Knock”

Reporting tragedy — the “death knock:”

“Each person a journalist contacts may react differently: slam a door in their face, break down in tears or welcome the chance to speak about a loved one,” writes Laura Hardy. “A journalist needs to be prepared for every possible scenario.”