All posts by cbukro

About cbukro

Casey Bukro was inducted into the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame in 2008 for outstanding contributions to Chicago journalism, after a 45 year career with the Chicago Tribune. Bukro retired from the Tribune in 2007 as overnight editor. He had pioneered in environmental reporting and in 1970 became the first full-time environment specialist at a major metropolitan newspaper in the United States and covered major developments on that beat for 30 years. He won the newspaper’s highest editorial award in 1967 for a series on Great Lakes pollution. The Society of Professional Journalists awarded Bukro its highest honor, the Wells Key, in 1983 for writing that organization’s first code of ethics. He is a past president of SPJ’s national ethics committee and a past president of the Chicago Headline Club. Bukro graduated with bachelor and master degrees from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. In 1998, he received the Northwestern University Alumni Association’s alumni service award for 17 years of volunteer service to the university. He has lectured in environmental journalism and journalism ethics at Northwestern, the University of Chicago, DePaul University, Loyola University Chicago, Columbia College, Columbia University and others. Before joining the Tribune staff, Bukro worked at the former City News Bureau of Chicago and the Janesville Gazette, Janesville, Wis.

Perils of Freelancing

Perils of freelancing: Freelancers are sharing rates and organizing as the pools of available money dwindles, writes Elizabeth King.

“Even in non-unionized workplaces, employees are legally protected if they want to discuss their pay with colleagues,” she writes, but it is considered risky or taboo.

 

Fairness First

Fairness first: Margaret Sullivan calls for a new approach to covering the Trump administration.

“First, we need to abandon neutrality-at-all-costs journalism, to replace it with something more suited to the moment,” she writes.

 

Hollywood Female Reporters

Hollywood female reporters: They don’t take notes and will do anything for a story, writes Elizabeth Spadaccini about an interview with Sophie Gilbert at the Center for Journalism Ethics.

“While it might make dramatic TV, it’s an inaccurate depiction of both the ethical code and the process of journalism,” writes Spadaccini.

 

Believing Election Results

Believing election results: Pew Research Center finds Americans who get most of their political news on social media display less confidence in the public’s acceptance of election results, regardless of the winner, than those who mostly get this news in other ways such as cable TV, news sites or print newspapers, write Mark Jurkowitz and Amy Mitchell.

 

Obscene Comics

Obscene comics: Artist Michael Diana is the first cartoonist in U.S. history to be jailed for obscenity, writes Meagan Damore.

Diana was sentenced in 1994 to prison, probation, community service and told to take a journalism ethics course, get a psychological exam, draw nothing obscene and avoid minors. He says public attitudes changed since the mid-1990s.