Tag Archives: iMediaEthics

Hexing Tax Collectors

Hexing tax collectors: Sydney Smith offers a roundup of recent media corrections.

Historical facts, names and numbers trip journalists, including Romanian witches.

“Stories aren’t the only content that needs editing,” writes Smith. “Case in point, an NPR graphic on the midterm elections had numerous errors.”

 

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American Bias

American bias: David W. Moore explores American racism.

“It is in the realm of possibility, I think, to suggest that most of us, and maybe all of us, are afflicted to some degree with implicit bias — but the notion that we all share the same biases seems completely implausible,” he writes. There may be a dominant culture related to race, but there also are many subcultures that produce different feelings.

 

MAGA Cap Gets Reporter Fired

MAGA cap gets reporter fired: A Minnesota multimedia reporter is fired for wearing a “Make America Great Again” cap while covering a Trump rally, writes Sydney Smith.

NBC-affiliate KTTC news director says staff members are forbidden to cover stories while wearing political campaign attire. The Society of Professional Journalists code of ethics says journalists should act independently and avoid conflicts of interest.

Phone Hacking Backfires

Phone hacking backfires: Sydney Smith writes that the News Of The World’s publisher continues to settle phone hacking claims seven years after the British newspaper shut down in a scandal that erupted over invasion of privacy and confidentiality.

The newspaper’s publisher “is still paying out and admitting to phone hacking allegations against it,” Smith writes.

 

Toronto Star Updates Standards

Toronto Star updates standards: Sydney Smith describes new guidelines that mesh long-standing principles with current digital realities.

New policies call for greater transparency, labels for news and opinion and reluctance to unpublish except for rare circumstances.

 

Crazy Media Poll Answers Kill Public Trust

Crazy media poll answers kill public trust: Davide W. Moore explores CBS News poll on investigation into Trump administration ties to Russia.

“Apart from the confusing wording of the initial question, the poll results suffer from not measuring how strongly people feel about the issue,” writes Moore. “It’s highly unlikely that 95 percent of the public has thought carefully about the issues involved in the investigation, yet that is what the poll results suggest.”

CBC Updates Standards

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation updates standards: Sydney Smith quotes source saying, “Given the extra scrutiny applied to journalism, there’s never been a time when standards in journalism have mattered more.”

Accuracy, fairness, balance and impartiality emphasized.

Guidelines include advice for using social media, new technologies like drones and bots and expand on the importance of respect and transparency.

 

Archive Photo Ruled Okay

Using a 2005 photo of a young woman posing in a British strip club was not an invasion of privacy, ruled the Independent Press Standards Organization.

Sydney Smith writes that IPSO found a news outlet may consider a voluntary action in the past fair game in the future.

The newspaper volunteered to take down the photo as a goodwill gesture and said it “understood that when one is young, one can make choices which are later regretted.”