Tag Archives: iMediaEthics

Decade of Media Ethics

Decade of media ethics: Sydney Smith gives an overview of major issues and trends from 2010-2019.

The term “fake news” rises in political reporting. Hoaxes, lawsuits, retractions and firings crop up in covering the president.

The last half of the decade saw an apparent decrease in plagiarism and fabrication cases.

 

Media Ethics Issues of 2019

Media ethics issues of 2019: Sydney Smith summarizes noteworthy media ethics issues.

Misinformation, verification, racism, bad taste and damaging tweets from the past are among them.

 

Reporting On Special Needs People

Reporting on special needs people: A complaint about a headline referring to a “wheelchair-bound man” caused a Canadian newspaper to caution its staff when reporting on people with disabilities, reported iMediaEthics.

The term is “antiquated and ableist” ruled Canada’s National News Media Council. Say “person who uses a wheelchair.”

 

Use Of Graphic Photos Explained:

Use of graphic photos explained: iMediaEthics writer Sydney Smith tells why the Associated Press, The New York Times and USA Today published photos of a dead man and his daughter drowned in the Rio Grande.

Deemed a moment in time showing the danger and desperation of immigrants from Central America.

 

Poynter Deletes List Of Unreliable Sites

Poynter deletes list of unreliable sites: Poynter Institute says it “messed up” in calling 515 websites unreliable without checking the facts, reports Sydney Smith.

“These lapses are surprising given Poynter’s reputation and position as a vaunted journalism education organization,” writes Smith. Poynter admitted using lists compiled by others. Blames “methodology.”

 

Peoria Journal Star Apologizes For Letter

Peoria Journal Star apologizes for letter: Editor Dennis Anderson said publishing a letter comparing the Illinois governor to Adolph Hitler “crossed a line.”

Linking abortion and the Holocaust was not right, Anderson wrote.

“Reckless references to abominable history are part and parcel to the astonishing decline of public discourse in our country, and in this case we should have known better,” he wrote.

 

BuzzFeed Adopts Rules For Covering Mass Shootings

BuzzFeed adopts rules for covering mass shootings: Don’t shy away from the story, but don’t glorify the assailant.

Sydney Smith describes guidelines for language on mass shootings. All interviews should be considered on the record until a reporter agrees to go off the record or on background.