Tag Archives: New York Times

Newsletter Secret Sauce

Newsletter secret saucer: Melina Delkic writes that the New York Times produces 55 newsletters that cover the day’s biggest news, commentary on social issues, cooking and more.

“Newsletters can be a way to streamline news coverage and separate what’s consequential from what’s trending,” she writes.

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Shooting Journalists

Shooting journalists: Sabrina Tavernise, Amy Harmon and Maya Salam report that mass shooting found a new target at the Capital Gazette, killing five.

“For a country that has grown numb to mass shootings, this was a new front,” they wrote. It is “a rare attack on a news organization, one of the oldest in America….”

Sleeping With Elephants

 

Reporters covering the circus can’t sleep with elephants: David Von Drehle faults editors in the affair between New York Times reporter Eli Watkins and a federal security aide.

“One after another, as Watkins rocketed up the career ladder, her supervisors failed to dig deeply enough to weigh the damage that could be done to the credibility of all media should her pillow talk be made public. Now that the laundry is aired and the damage is done, some of these same editors are minimizing the impact on media credibility.”

Defining Civility

Defining civility: The Washington Post’s editorial board sees strong political feelings spilling over into the private sphere.

“We understand the strength of feelings, but we don’t think the spilling is a healthy development,” says the board. “Those who are insisting that we are in a special moment justifying incivility should think for a moment how many Americans might find their own special moment.”

Other views on civility and media appear in Commentary, Vice, Salon, the Washington Post, the New York Times and Vox.

Affair Rocks Washington Media

Affair rocks Washington media: New York Times staff writers take a close look at the three-year affair between a NYT reporter and a security aide source, now part of a federal investigation and seizure of records.

“Avoiding conflicts of interest is a basic tenet of journalism, and intimate involvement with a source is verboten,” they write. But the central point is the seizure of a reporter’s records, says a Times statement.

Trump Porn Stifles News Gathering

Trump porn stifles news gathering: Nicholas Kristof writes that the national nonstop focus on Trump takes attention away from major issues like drug overdoses and shorter life expectancy.

“The biggest Trump scandals aren’t those unfolding in Washington, but those devastating the lives of the poor and vulnerable in distant American towns,” he writes.

Falling Short On Covering AIDS And Gays

Falling short on covering AIDS and gays: New York Times staffers find the newspaper “had a spotty record of covering the AIDS epidemic in the early 1980s — and gay culture in general.”

When covered, those stories were “often buried in the back of the newspaper” and deemed not important enough for the front page.

Report For America

Report For America: Nellie Bowles updates status of nonprofit Report For America, aiming to put a thousand journalists in understaffed newsrooms by 2022.

Applicants “want to try to save democracy,” says a founder. Fellowships last one to two years and pay about $40,000.

“I felt like I needed to give something back to a place that has given a lot to me,” says one of the first reporters selected. “And journalism is the way for me to do that.”

 

 

Who Rates An Obit?

Who rates an obit? The New York Times ponders why most obituaries are still of white men.

“So why not more women and people of color on the obituary pages?” asks its obituaries editor. “Why, for that matter, not more openly gay people, or transgender people?” Obits are among the most heavily read parts of media.

 

Unplugging From The Internet

Unplugging from the internet, a questionable experiment: Dan Mitchell questions the accuracy of a New York Times columnist’s claim that he went offline, dispensing avuncular advice to his readers about the benefits of slowing down one’s news consumption.

“But he didn’t really unplug from social media at all,” writes Mitchell.