Tag Archives: New York Times

Etiquette of Linking

Etiquette of linking: The New York Times standards editor tells why the company’s journalists should always link and credit, write Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai and Jason Koebler.

It’s just good journalism to link. It’s free and easy. Readers like it.

 

NYT Privacy Project

NYT Privacy Project: The Times launches an investigation into the erosion of digital privacy, including its own practices.

“Though we know we must participate in this messy and rapidly changing ecosystem — one with plenty of bad actors — we are also working to ensure our own data practices live up to our values,” writes Publisher A.G. Sulzberger.

 

Justifying Photos of Death

Justifying photos of death: New York Times photos of a terror attack on a Nairobi hotel, leaving 21 dead, were called distasteful, writes Eyder Peralta.

The Times responds that “it is important to give our readers a clear picture of the horror of an attack like this,” adding that the pictures were not sensationalized but give a real sense of the situation.

 

Morality Clauses

Morality clauses: Writers find them in their contracts, writes Judith Shulevitz, but “immorality is a slippery concept,” like “public disrepute.” The public is fickle in what it takes umbrage at.

“Times change, norms change with them. Morality clauses hand the power to censor to publishers, not the government, so they don’t violate the constitutional right to free speech. But that power is still dangerous.”

 

Tips On Pitching Freelance Stories

Tips on pitching freelance stories: Knowing exactly what your story is about is crucial to piquing an editor’s interest, writes Tim Herrera.

Write “a solid, clear, powerful nut graf,” he advises. Impress the editor.

“Get me interested to learn more, but more important, make me want to tell this story to the readers of my publication,” writes Herrera.

 

Kavanaugh Story Told In Photos

Kavanaugh story told in photos: Darrel Frost tells how the New York Times used two images to show contrasting views in the Kavanaugh hearing.

“This is masterful storytelling on the part of the Times’s photo editors,” writes Frost. “It’s rare we see a national political figure in such aggressive visage — not to mention a possible justice of the Supreme Court — and the photo, in this case, could portray the contrasts in the testimony in a way that text couldn’t.”

 

Spotting Fake Facebook Posts

Spotting fake Facebook posts: Keith Collins and Sheera Frenkel report that Facebook discovered hundreds of fake pages and user accounts this summer.

The New York Times reporters show real and deceptive posts, asking if you can tell which is fake. It isn’t easy.

The latest influence campaigns imitated post by legitimate pages and groups on Facebook that advocate political beliefs, they report, “amking it difficult to tell what was a genuine post and what was not.” Such campaigns also are known as online disinformation.

Readers Ruffled By NYT Story On LA

Readers ruffled by New York Times story on Los Angeles: Sydney Smith reports that two New York Times travel editors apologized for painting Los Angeles as “the source of all useless items in the world,” including Jesus statues.

Readers thought the article “dismissive of Latino culture and cliched in its portayal of the city.” This was considered offensive.