Tag Archives: New York Times

Tips On Pitching Freelance Stories

Tips on pitching freelance stories: Knowing exactly what your story is about is crucial to piquing an editor’s interest, writes Tim Herrera.

Write “a solid, clear, powerful nut graf,” he advises. Impress the editor.

“Get me interested to learn more, but more important, make me want to tell this story to the readers of my publication,” writes Herrera.

 

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Kavanaugh Story Told In Photos

Kavanaugh story told in photos: Darrel Frost tells how the New York Times used two images to show contrasting views in the Kavanaugh hearing.

“This is masterful storytelling on the part of the Times’s photo editors,” writes Frost. “It’s rare we see a national political figure in such aggressive visage — not to mention a possible justice of the Supreme Court — and the photo, in this case, could portray the contrasts in the testimony in a way that text couldn’t.”

 

Spotting Fake Facebook Posts

Spotting fake Facebook posts: Keith Collins and Sheera Frenkel report that Facebook discovered hundreds of fake pages and user accounts this summer.

The New York Times reporters show real and deceptive posts, asking if you can tell which is fake. It isn’t easy.

The latest influence campaigns imitated post by legitimate pages and groups on Facebook that advocate political beliefs, they report, “amking it difficult to tell what was a genuine post and what was not.” Such campaigns also are known as online disinformation.

Readers Ruffled By NYT Story On LA

Readers ruffled by New York Times story on Los Angeles: Sydney Smith reports that two New York Times travel editors apologized for painting Los Angeles as “the source of all useless items in the world,” including Jesus statues.

Readers thought the article “dismissive of Latino culture and cliched in its portayal of the city.” This was considered offensive.

 

What “Off The Record” Means

What “off the record” means: Matt Flegenheimer gives his interpretation of ways journalists get information from Washington officials and rules they sometimes follow.

“As a general principle, a reporter’s best course of action is to establish jargon-free parameters in plain English at the start: Can a source be quoted by name? Can we use the information if we leave out the name? Can we at least describe the source’s job?” he writes.

“But among those who have long dealt with the news media, like politicians and their charges, there is occasionally a sort of shorthand for these questions.”

 

 

Staying On The Record

Staying on the record: Steven Pearlberg reports that Dean Baquet, New York Times executive editor, took a personal ethical stance in refusing to join in an off-the-record meeting with President Trump.

“I don’t think officials should be able to tell me things that I can’t publish,” says Baquet, hewing to a philosophy that journalists should control the terms of an interview.

Not wanting to be courted or wooed, Baquet says “the leader of the news gathering operation shouldn’t have access that reporters don’t get.”

Solidarity Among Reporters

Solidarity among reporters: Michael Grynbaum writes about “an unusual show of solidarity” at a White House press briefing when Jordan Fabian yields to Hallie Jackson.

It “seemed to signal a new approach by the White House press corps toward an administration that regularly uses briefings to deride, and divide, the news media.” Called a “classy move.”