Tag Archives: Center for Journalism Ethics

Using Drones In Journalism

Using drones in journalism: Newsrooms need policies on using drones, according to a Center for Journalism Ethics report.

“While news organizations and individual journalists are safely integrating drones into their daily operations, as well as the national airspace, it is crucial to remember that this evolving technology still faces many regulatory and legislative hurdles, not to mention privacy issues and ethical concerns,” says the report.

Advertisements

Media Covering Their Own Scandals

Media covering their own scandals: Sex scandals in 2017 and 2018 brought down top media figures, forcing outlets to report about themselves.

Organizations faced questions of how sexual harassment and assault could fester unaddressed, writes Claudia Meyer-Samargia.

“But for individual journalists, particularly those who cover news media, questions focused on how they could cover these cases ethically, with the right balance of truth-telling, transparency and respect for privacy.” Protecting an organization’s reputation is an issue.

 

What #MeToo Means To Ethical Journalism

What #MeToo means to ethical journalism: Three “tragedies” lurk in the tech workplace, finds Claudia Meyere-Samargia while covering a University of Wisconsin ethics conference.

Quoting tech journalist Kara Swisher, they are lack of self-awareness and reflection, believing that money equates social good and having the inability to empathize with people who are not like you.

 

Ethical Media Election Coverage

Ethical media election coverage: “The ethics question at the heart of election coverage is this: What approaches best serve the public interest?” writes Isaac Alter.

Covering it like a horse race trivializes elections, he says. Write about the candidates themselves; don’t overplay opinion polls.

 

 

Ethics of Stock Imagery

Ethics of stock imagery: Using old images with new stories is not ethical journalism, Mark E. Johnson tells Jack Kelly. It’s like using generic quotes in a story.

Visuals attached to stories increase engagement, writes Kelly. But “photojournalists and visual journalists are often the first members of a newsroom to be the victims of budget cuts,” resulting in the use of stock images.

 

High Ethical Standards In Pursuit of News

High ethical standards in pursuit of news: The Center for Journalism
Ethics names ProPublica a finalist for an ethics award.

In telling the story of a high school student trying to escape gang membership, ProPublica did not publish his last name or run photos that might reveal his identity.

 

Revealing A Religion Reporter’s Religion

Revealing a religion reporter’s religion: One religion reporter had a strict policy against revealing her faith, writes Jaweed Kaleem.

“Today, as reporters become more diverse — by race, religion and more — and notions of objectivity become increasingly debated, some journalists on the religion beat are choosing to be more open  about their own faiths, and lack thereof,” he writes.

 

Unique Challenges Of Religion Reporting

Unique challenges of religion reporting: Steven Potter writes about the difficulties of the religion beat.

“As they dive into different cultures and broach highly sensitive subjects with complete strangers, they face a number of unique challenges,” he writes.

Chicago Tribune religion reporter Manya Brachear Pashman says her mission “is to teach people about religions they may not be exposed to,” and put aside personal beliefs.

Correcting Twitter Mistakes With Transparency

Correcting Twitter mistakes with transparency: Steven Potter tells how Thomson Reuters and the Associated Press correct Twitter mistakes.

“We don’t believe that an incorrect tweet should just be deleted without any further comment,” says a Thomson Reuters source. “To us, that would be lack of accountability.”