Category Archives: Social Media

Ombudsman Target of Sex Abuse Probe

Ombudsman is target of sex abuse probe: Alan Stamm reports that Jack Lessenberry, ombudsman at The Blade in Toledo, is under investigation for alleged misbehavior at a Memphis newspaper and at Wayne State University, where he taught.

Lessenberry has called sexual harassment “a national buzzword” and “the current crime the nation is fixated on.”

 

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How The Internet Found Its Voice

How the internet found its voice: Lyz Lenz analyzes the rise of internet writing.

“It comes as no surprise that finding and creating a cohesive understanding of internet writing is just as dubious, problematic and maddening as the internet itself,” she writes.

“The internet, with its irreverence and short attention span, is a perfect vehicle for crassly delightful send-up humor.”

 

Guarding Against Deepfakes

Guarding against deepfakes: Nicholas Diakopoulos writes that a media synthesis algorithm generates convincing but fake video.

“Dire as the case may be, it could offer a great comeback opportunity for mainstream media,” writes Diakopoulos. Trained journalists can act as validators and assessors of mediated reality the public can trust.

 

Making Transparency Clear

Making transparency clear: Andrew Seaman explains how “transparency” grew as a recognized concept in journalism.

Journalism was largely opaque until the invention and widespread use of the internet, he writes.

“News organizations can no longer stubbornly refuse to issue corrections or other clarifications without pushback,” he writes. “Journalists and news organizations are — in many ways — completely exposed to the public.”

 

Facebook Community Standards

Facebook publishes its community standards:

Hate speech defined as “a direct attack on people based on what we call protected characteristics — race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, sex, gender, gender identity and serious disability or disease.”

The goal of its community standards “is to encourage expression and create a safe environment.”

Facebook says “we remove content, disable accounts and work with law enforcement when we believe there is a genuine risk of physical harm or direct threats to public safety.”

CBC Updates Standards

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation updates standards: Sydney Smith quotes source saying, “Given the extra scrutiny applied to journalism, there’s never been a time when standards in journalism have mattered more.”

Accuracy, fairness, balance and impartiality emphasized.

Guidelines include advice for using social media, new technologies like drones and bots and expand on the importance of respect and transparency.

 

Right To Be Forgotten

Right to be forgotten: Chava Gourarie writes about two British men who sued to keep their past crimes out of Google search results.

“As the first case to test the ‘right to be forgotten’ in England’s High Court, its outcome will likely set some ground rules in the roiling debate between personal privacy and freedom of expression on the internet,” she writes.

Facebook Trust Guidelines

Facebook guide to what to read, trust and share in News Feed:

Based on research, “we’re making it easy for people to view context about an article, including the publisher’s Wikipedia entry, related articles on the same topic, information about how many times the article has been shared on Facebook, where it has been shared, as well as an option to follow the publisher’s page,” write Taylor Hughes, Jeff Smith and Alex Leavitt.

Bias Seen In Facebook Coverage

Bias seen in Facebook coverage: Mathew Ingram writes that “at least some of the enthusiasm with which media companies are covering Facebook’s trials and tribulations stems from their resentment over how the company has stolen their readers and advertising revenue.”

Media executives failed to adapt quickly enough to the internet, and then in a desperate attempt to catch up, handed too much of their business to Facebook and Google, he writes.

Unplugging From The Internet

Unplugging from the internet, a questionable experiment: Dan Mitchell questions the accuracy of a New York Times columnist’s claim that he went offline, dispensing avuncular advice to his readers about the benefits of slowing down one’s news consumption.

“But he didn’t really unplug from social media at all,” writes Mitchell.