Tag Archives: Pew Research Center

Digital Dunces

Digital dunces: Pew Research Center finds many American adults fail digital knowledge quiz.

:While a majority of U.S. adults can correctly answer questions about phishing scams or cookies, other items are more challenging,” like two-factor authentication, says Pew.

 

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Public Trust In Leaders

Public trust in leaders: Pew Research Center finds Americans have varying degrees of confidence in those who hold important positions of power and responsibility.

Public school principals, military leaders and police officers rank high in confidence. Religious leaders, journalists and local elected officials rank low.

 

Journalists Engaged In Communities Preferred

Journalists engaged in communities preferred: The Pew Research Center finds urban and rural residents want news from journalists personally engaged in their communities, writes Elizabeth Grieco.

Urban resident say journalists are more likely to cover their areas, and see certain local news topics as important for daily life. They also rely on online sources for local news. Rural dwellers less satisfied.

Public Thinks Local News Thrives

Public thinks local news thrives: Few pay for it, it’s free and TV is top source, writes Laura Hazard Owen, city Pew research.

Seventy-one percent of those surveyed believe their local news outlets are doing very or somewhat well financially, in part because TV is doing better than hard-hit newspapers.

 

Social Media Tops Print As News Source

Social media tops print as news source: For the first time, more Americans get news from social media than print newspapers, says the Pew Research Center.

Overall, television still is the most popular platform for news consumption, writes Elisa Shearer. Age gaps widen in media preferences. Print’s popularity persists among ages 65 and older. Younger Americans are not wed to one platform.

 

Youths Best At Telling Fact From Opinion

Youths are best at telling fact from opinion: A Pew Research Center news analysis finds younger Americans are better than elders at separating factual statements in the news from opinion.

“This stronger ability to classify statements regardless of their ideological appeals may well be tied to the fact that younger adults — especially Millennials — are less likely to strongly identify with either political party,” write Jeffrey Gottfried and Elizabeth Greico.

“Younger Americans also are more ‘digitally savvy’ than their elders, a characteristic that is also tied to greater success at classifying news statements.”