Category Archives: Accountability

Covering Deadly Cold Weather

Covering deadly cold weather: Midwest reporters face a daunting challenge when temperatures drop to 30 below with wind chills at 55 below.

“So how do you cover a story about how dangerous it is to be outside when it’s too dangerous to be outside?” asks Tom Jones.

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Rethinking Celebrity Journalism

Rethinking celebrity journalism: Covering the foibles of celebrities is like pandering to lurid curiosity, says a story in the Ethics AdviceLine for Journalists archives.

Instead, look for entertaining stories about men and women in business, commerce and industry who take themselves so seriously.

 

Media Jumping to Conclusions

Media jumping to conclusions: The story about an encounter between Covington Catholic students and a Native American elder went global, and many in the media got it wrong.

“What responsible journalists do in such instances is exactly what they did here,” writes Kelly Hawes. “They keep reporting. They keep asking questions. They keep searching for the truth. When they’re wrong, they admit it. And they set the record straight.”

 

Justifying Photos of Death

Justifying photos of death: New York Times photos of a terror attack on a Nairobi hotel, leaving 21 dead, were called distasteful, writes Eyder Peralta.

The Times responds that “it is important to give our readers a clear picture of the horror of an attack like this,” adding that the pictures were not sensationalized but give a real sense of the situation.

 

Vanishing Media Ombudsmen

Vanishing media ombudsmen: The Ethics AdviceLine for Journalists laments the loss of sharp-eyed ombudsmen and media writers like Margaret Sullivan.

“You’d think an ombudsman would be most useful in a time of change, especially in a time of budget-cutting and layoffs — just to be sure the public interest is served, and the quality of journalism is strong,” says a story in AdviceLine’s archives.

Cloud Cyberattacks Growing

Cloud cyberattacks growing: Businesses can fail to identify risks and control them, writes Aseem Rastogi.

“While cloud service providers are responsible for protecting the cloud infrastructure,” he writes, “customers must monitor other vulnerabilities as attackers will look for easy targets…. Integrated or unified solutions that provide visibility across the organization’s services could be the best defense.”