Category Archives: Accuracy

Rethinking Celebrity Journalism

Rethinking celebrity journalism: Covering the foibles of celebrities is like pandering to lurid curiosity, says a story in the Ethics AdviceLine for Journalists archives.

Instead, look for entertaining stories about men and women in business, commerce and industry who take themselves so seriously.

 

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Media Jumping to Conclusions

Media jumping to conclusions: The story about an encounter between Covington Catholic students and a Native American elder went global, and many in the media got it wrong.

“What responsible journalists do in such instances is exactly what they did here,” writes Kelly Hawes. “They keep reporting. They keep asking questions. They keep searching for the truth. When they’re wrong, they admit it. And they set the record straight.”

 

Justifying Photos of Death

Justifying photos of death: New York Times photos of a terror attack on a Nairobi hotel, leaving 21 dead, were called distasteful, writes Eyder Peralta.

The Times responds that “it is important to give our readers a clear picture of the horror of an attack like this,” adding that the pictures were not sensationalized but give a real sense of the situation.

 

Using Twitter Ethically

Using Twitter ethically: Twitter evolved from an oddity to a key tool for gathering and reporting news, writes David Craig.

Ethical pressure points: Handling unverified information, navigating between personal and professional boundaries and providing context and narrative structure. From the Ethics AdviceLine for Journalists archives.

 

The Hazards of Fact-Checking

The hazards of fact-checking: Three media and law groups join to form the Fact-Checkers Legal Support Initiative to fend off attacks on fact-checkers.

“Many are being threatened with lawsuits and often do not have the resources to defend themselves,” says FLSI.

Threats include online harassment and physical violence by those exposed in the public arena for misinformation.

 

Reporting Tragedy — The “Death Knock”

Reporting tragedy — the “death knock:”

“Each person a journalist contacts may react differently: slam a door in their face, break down in tears or welcome the chance to speak about a loved one,” writes Laura Hardy. “A journalist needs to be prepared for every possible scenario.”