Kavanaugh Story Told In Photos

Kavanaugh story told in photos: Darrel Frost tells how the New York Times used two images to show contrasting views in the Kavanaugh hearing.

“This is masterful storytelling on the part of the Times’s photo editors,” writes Frost. “It’s rare we see a national political figure in such aggressive visage — not to mention a possible justice of the Supreme Court — and the photo, in this case, could portray the contrasts in the testimony in a way that text couldn’t.”

 

Advertisements

PBS Public Editor Quits, Dismayed

PBS editor quits, dismayed: Sydney Smith reports that departing public editor Mahulika Sikka found the public does not understand PBS.

“During my time as public editor at PBS,” she told Smith, “I was most struck by the fact that most people don’t understand the system, how it was set up, how it works, the fact that PBS is not a network and doesn’t produce content, and the fact that each station is locally run in order to serve the community it is part of.”

Journalism’s Top Problems

Journalism’s top problems: Jay Rosen lists challenges that torment journalists, including a right-wing populist wave across the U.S. and Europe that views the mainstream press as corrupt and elitist.

“In the United States the president is leading a hate movement against journalism,” Rosen writes. He also finds that discovering a business model that can sustain a quality newsroom is the industry’s biggest problem, but journalism schools are not designed for that.

Toronto Star Updates Standards

Toronto Star updates standards: Sydney Smith describes new guidelines that mesh long-standing principles with current digital realities.

New policies call for greater transparency, labels for news and opinion and reluctance to unpublish except for rare circumstances.

 

Media Bullying

Media bullying: Alexandria Neason and Nausicaa Renner comment on media intimidation of Prof. Christine Blasey Ford.

“Journalists spend much of our professional lives wading through justifications for our subjects’ behavior and asking when has it crossed an ethical line,” they write. “This hearing shows the urgent need for us to examine our own.”

 

The Many Names Of Marijuana

The many names of marijuana: Caren Lissner writes that “as more journalists cover the (legalized marijuana) industry, worth billions of dollars, many have had to scrutinize the synonyms and slang they use — often at the urging of merchants.”

Sellers say the word “marijuana” has a dark history, while “pot” is objectionable and “weed” is too informal for a substance with medical applications.

Staying Sane In A News Storm

Staying sane in a news storm: Margaret Sullivan gives seven tips to keep your cool in a hot mess, including:

“Take a break. The news never stops, so put down your phone, turn off your TV and do something else for a few hours. Cook a meal, take a walk, go to a yoga class, read a 19th-century novel.

“Of course, there’s a downside. Chances are that when you come back, some fresh mess will have hit the fan. But at least your heart rate will be lower — for a minute — while you catch up.”

 

Fact-Checking The NAFTA Agreement

Fact-checking the NAFTA agreement: Daniel Funke writes about concerns over false and inaccurate claims about the North American Trade Agreement and American trade policy. President Trump threatened to end the agreement.

“The goal: Bring more attention to policy issues that don’t get enough attention in a 24-hour news cycle dominated by Trump coverage,” he writes.