Beware Pitfalls Of Amateur Video

Beware pitfalls of amateur video: The Toledo Blade’s managing editor apologizes for mistakes in reporting a fatal police-involved shooting based on a flawed Facebook video.

“The first of several mistakes we made in covering this breaking story was to share on our website a Facebook Live feed of a young man recording the gathering crowd in North Toledo and what people were saying. The man repeated over and over that police had shot ‘a young boy,’ a ’16-year-old boy,’ telling his Facebook audience that ‘someone said’ the boy was kneeling in the street when ‘the police’ shot him.

“None of that was true,” wrote the editor. The video photographer was not a trained journalist “and in our haste to ‘get something up’ we grabbed his Facebook video and shared it.” It was removed when police explained they shot a 25-year-old armed robbery suspect.

Another mistake was an inflammatory headline, later changed, saying “Police gun down man in North Toledo.”

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Staying On The Record

Staying on the record: Steven Pearlberg reports that Dean Baquet, New York Times executive editor, took a personal ethical stance in refusing to join in an off-the-record meeting with President Trump.

“I don’t think officials should be able to tell me things that I can’t publish,” says Baquet, hewing to a philosophy that journalists should control the terms of an interview.

Not wanting to be courted or wooed, Baquet says “the leader of the news gathering operation shouldn’t have access that reporters don’t get.”

Protecting Female Reporters From On-Air Sex Assault

Protecting female reporters from on-air sex assault: Britni de la Cretz finds some broadcasting companies react when female journalists are groped or harassed on camera.

“Such companies offered the journalists time off, therapy or counseling services, and opportunities to reevaluate whether they wished to continue reporting from those locations where they were assaulted,” she writes.

“Each woman indicated that her newsroom took the incidents incredibly seriously, especially considering the long-term psychological risks of harassment on the job, and responded in a way that felt adequate, though that may not always be the case.”

Domestic Violence Coverage Standards

Domestic violence coverage standards: Justin Ray examines a conflict between Vermont State Police and the Barre Times Argus over a murder-suicide.

The local newspaper “ultimately pledged to improve its standards for domestic violence coverage — though the paper’s editor raised concerns about the (police) spokesman’s voluble criticism and the potential precedent it sets for the paper’s relationship with a prominent state agency,” Ray writes.

Updating News Archives

Updating news archives: Rick Paulus writes that outdated “trapped-in-time” news segments don’t tell the whole story.

“Creating detailed stories from the splinters of larger narratives is at the core of news gathering,” he writes.

“Journalists are charged with determining the scope of stories — where they begin and end, how broad or narrow a story should be. That challenge is now complicated by digital duplication, infinite archives and instantaneous access to them.”

 

 

Rapper Buys News Site To Avenge Bad Press

Rapper buys news site to avenge bad press: Regina Gurung questions Chance The Rapper’s motives for buying the dormant Chicagoist.com, a local news website.

In song, he vowed to run the Chicago Sun-Times “out of business.”

“Now that he is ‘Chance The Media Mogul,’ we can only hope he doesn’t control the basics of journalism ethics,” writes Gurung.

Local News Death Spiral

Local news death spiral: Kyle Pope reports that job cuts at the New York Daily News signals need to avoid self-pity in journalism.

“This can’t be about us,” he writes. “It has to be about why the country should care if local news goes away, which is the trajectory we now find ourselves on. What are the effects on a democracy if local news is no longer in the picture?”

He adds: “If you’re in journalism and you can’t muster an answer to that question, you need to move on.”

Tech Journalism

Tech journalism: James Ball calls for a universal approach.

“Maybe we should simply scrap the idea of a ‘tech desk’ altogether”, he writes.

“The sector needs scrutiny, but since technology now touches every aspect of our society, keeping it siloed from the rest of the newsroom now feels artificial. Let it be covered, extensively, across desks.”

Solidarity Among Reporters

Solidarity among reporters: Michael Grynbaum writes about “an unusual show of solidarity” at a White House press briefing when Jordan Fabian yields to Hallie Jackson.

It “seemed to signal a new approach by the White House press corps toward an administration that regularly uses briefings to deride, and divide, the news media.” Called a “classy move.”